Tag Archives: Green Peas

Quinoa, The Kedgeree Way

Quinoa Mackerel Kedgeree

  • Servings: 1
  • Difficulty: easy
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Quinoa, The Kedgeree Way

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The original idea was to use quinoa instead of rice in a mackerel kedgeree. However, for some reason, my water judgement went a tad haywire and so I ended up with a quinoa kedgeree which was a bit wet. Still, the end result was really delicious and I will be repeating the recipe (with more success the next time I hope!).

The mackerel used here was fresh. But for kedgeree, tinned fish would work quite well.

My following version of quinoa mackerel kedgeree is adapted from Jack and Jamie.

enjoy hot with wedges of lime or lemon

Ingredients

2 Medium sized mackerel

2 Bayleaf

4-5 Peppercorns

1/2 Cup uncooked quinoa

2 Onions

1 Head garlic

2 Tomato

1 Cup green pea

A handful of spinach

2-3 Green chilli

Fresh ginger the size of your thumb

3-4 Sprigs fresh parsley

1-2 Teaspoons ghee

1 Teaspoon mustard seeds

3-4 green cardamom

1 Teaspoon turmeric powder

1 Teaspoon coriander powder

1 Teaspoon cumin powder

1 Teaspoon garam masala

Salt to taste

1 Egg

Juice of 1 Lime or lemon

Method

  1. First, prep the mackerel. Place it in a pan and add water just enough to cover the fish.
  2. Add a pinch of salt, bay leaf and peppercorn.
  3. Bring to boil, lower heat, cover and simmer for about 8 to 10 minutes till the fish is cooked.
  4. Remove the fish to a plate and let it cool down.
  5. Reserve the poaching liquor (you can remove the bay leaf and peppercorn if you like).
  6. Once the fish is cool enough to handle, separate the flesh from the bones.
  7. Leave the flesh in large chunks and set aside.
  8. Wash and chop the spinach.
  9. Wash the green pea.
  10. Peel, wash and dice the onion,.
  11. Peel and slice the garlic.
  12. Wash and chop the tomato.
  13. Wash and slice the chilli.
  14. Wash and grate the ginger.
  15. Wash and chop the parsley.
  16. In a bowl, combine the powdered spices – turmeric, cumin, coriander and garam masala.
  17. Heat the ghee in a frying pan.
  18. Once it is hot, lower the heat and add the mustard seeds and green cardamom.
  19. Stir for 30 seconds and throw in the chopped onion and salt to taste. Cover and cook for 5 minutes.
  20. Uncover and add the garlic, ginger and green chilli. Cover and cook for 5 more minutes.
  21. Uncover and add the chopped tomato. Cover and cook for 2 to 3 minutes.
  22. Uncover and add the quinoa, peas and powdered spices. Mix well.
  23. Now measure the poaching liquor and add it to the pan along with additional water, if required. Usually, the ratio of quinoa to water is 1:2 or 1:3.
  24. Stir everything together, bring to boil, cover and cook for 20 minutes.
  25. While the quinoa is cooking, hard boil the egg.
  26. At the end of 20 minutes, uncover the quinoa pan and add the spinach, lemon juice and mackerel flesh. Combine very gently making sure that you don’t break up the fish.
  27. Cover and cook for 5 minutes till the spinach is wilted.
  28. Take the pan off the heat.
  29. Shell and quarter the egg.
  30. Plate the quinoa kedgeree. Garnish with parsley and egg quarters. Enjoy hot.

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Colocasia with Green Pea & Corn, The Indian Way

Arbi Makai Matar

  • Servings: 1-2
  • Difficulty: easy
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Arbi Makai Matar

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The other day, I was chatting to my friend Meher who told me that she had had one of the yummiest colocasia preparations for lunch, courtesy one of her work colleagues. She didn’t know the recipe except that the tuber was first fried in order to get rid of the stickiness.

This got me thinking about how I have not had colocasia in absolutely ages, probably years.

colocasia is also known as arbi, elephant-ear, taro and dasheen

Since it is a starchy root vegetable, the kooky side in me decided to look up its nutritional information in order to decide whether to cook with it or not.

Was pleasantly surprised to discover that although high in calorie (100 grams has 112 calories, more than potato), the root is very low in fat and protein and “is one of the finest source of dietary fibers“.  It also contains minerals, potassium and vitamins from the B-complex group.

Since the calorie count is high, I decided to team it with a couple of other vegetables to make a balanced meal. I don’t mind the fact that it is sticky so I boiled the root  before adding it to the curry. An alternative would be to saute the boiled slices to get a crust before slipping them in the sauce.

I made up the recipe as I went along and, if I am allowed to boast a little, this is one of my kooky triumphs. You know how sometimes you cook something and its like, “meh”. And other times you make something which turns out so stupendous that you want to share it with everyone and shout from the roof-top… Okay, you get the picture! Oh, and it smells totally divine.

Will go very well with any type of flat bread like roti, naan or even sliced. Can also be eaten with rice.

Ingredients

100 Grams colocasia

50 Grams green pea

50 Grams sweetcorn kernel

2 Tomato

2 Onions

1 Tablespoon paste of ginger and garlic

1 Cup plain yoghurt (sharp/tangy/sour)

1 Teaspoon turmeric powder

1 Teaspoon chilli powder

1 Teaspoon coriander powder

1 Teaspoon cumin powder

1 Tablespoon fennel seeds

3 Dry red chillies

A pinch of asafoetida

Salt to taste

1-2 Teaspoons oil

Method

  1. First, boil the colocasia till it is firm but tender. You can either do this in a pressure cooker or in boiling water.
  2. Once the colocasia is cooked, let it cool down.
  3. Wash, peel and slice it in thick rounds.
  4. Peel, wash and finely chop the onion.
  5. Wash and dice the tomato.
  6. Wash the green pea and sweetcorn kernels.
  7. Whisk the yoghurt and add the turmeric, chilli, coriander and cumin powders to it. Mix well and set aside.
  8. Break the dry chillies into 2-3 pieces each.
  9. Heat the oil in a pan.
  10. Once hot, lower the heat and add fennel seeds, dry chillies and asafoetida.
  11. Stir for about 30 seconds.
  12. Add the chopped onion and salt to taste. Mix, cover and let the onion cook for 5 minutes.
  13. Uncover and add the paste of ginger and garlic.
  14. Stir well and let this cook for 2 to 3 minutes.
  15. Next, add the chopped tomato. Cover and cook for 3 to 4 minutes.
  16. Uncover and add the spiced yoghurt.
  17. Stir everything together and cook for 3 to 4 minutes.
  18. Add about 2 cups of water, increase the heat and bring to boil.
  19. Once the sauce starts boiling, lower the heat and add the sliced colocasia, green pea and sweetcorn kernel.
  20. Cover and cook for about 20 minutes.
  21. Take the pan off the burner and let it sit for 5 minutes before serving.

Sweet Potato, Courgette & Green Pea Rösti/Latke/Potato Pancake

Sweet Potato, Courgette & Green Pea Rösti/Latke/Potato Pancake

  • Servings: 1-2
  • Difficulty: easy
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Sweet Potato, Courgette & Green Pea Rosti

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There are so many different variations of potato pancake all over the world that it can get a bit confusing differentiating between them.

In some countries, you add flour while in others you don’t. Some cuisines add eggs, others don’t. Some add onion and cheese, others don’t. You get the picture…

Traditional Swiss rösti recipe doesn’t call for eggs and flour whereas the Jewish latke does. My version includes eggs and instant oats (instead of flour) so does this mean that I have made a latke or a rösti or neither (because of the oats)? See what I mean about the confusion?!

Today’s recipe is a union of two separate ones that I came across on the internet.

The first was fresh pea, courgette and parmesan rosti by Ainsley Harriott on the BBC food website. While I found it interesting, I wanted to include sweet potato as well. Ainsley’s recipe includes eggs and I wasn’t sure whether a rösti of sweet potato and eggs would work so researched a bit more and came across Sweet Potato Rösti (hash browns) by Julia Mueller of The Roasted Root. Julia’s recipe is a frills-free, elegant one of sweet potato and eggs.

So I decided to combine the two with a couple of my kooky modifications. Firstly, I substituted rice flour (from Ainsley’s recipe) with instant oats. And secondly, I didn’t squeeze out excess moisture from grated courgette and sweet potato nor did I blanch the green pea as that would have meant stripping the vegetables of vital nutrients.

the end result is the most delicious and moreish rösti/latke/potato pancake

Ingredients

1 Large courgette

1 Large sweet potato

1 Cup green pea

1 Large onion

10-12 Basil leaves

1-2 Tablespoon pine nuts

1-2 Tablespoons grated parmesan

2 Eggs

3-4 Tablespoons instant oats

Salt to taste

1 Teaspoon olive oil

Method

  1. First work on the pine nuts. Dry roast them in a frying pan till they turn a couple of shades darker and release a lovely nutty aroma. Set aside.
  2. Next, work on the vegetables. Roughly crush the green pea in a food processor.
  3. Peel, wash and coarsely grate the sweet potato.
  4. Wash and grate the courgette.
  5. Peel, wash and finely chop the onion.
  6. Wash and shred the basil leaves.
  7. In a mixing bowl, combine the grated sweet potato, courgette, crushed green pea, chopped onion, shredded basil leaves, toasted pine nuts, parmesan and salt to taste.
  8. Keep this mixture aside for a couple of hours. This will allow the oats to absorb excess moisture from the sweet potato and courgette.
  9. When you are ready to cook, gently beat the two eggs and fold them into the vegetable mixture.
  10. Heat the oil in a non-stick frying pan.
  11. Add the batter, one spoonful at a time, leaving space in between. Don’t worry if it is a bit watery of runny, it will firm up thanks to the eggs.
  12. Gently pat down the rösti with the back of the spoon. Cook for about 10 minutes.
  13. Flip over and cook the other side for 10 minutes.
  14. Serve hot.

Purple Yam, Aubergine & Green Pea Curry

Purple Yam, Aubergine & Green Pea Curry

  • Servings: 2
  • Difficulty: easy
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Purple Yam, Aubergine & Green Pea Curry

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As summer peaks its head from around the corner, it is time to say au revoir to green garlic, fresh turmeric and purple yam.

here is a quick, simple and delicious vegetable curry which is easily adaptable to what’s available or in your kitchen

I made it in under an hour while enjoying The Soul Of Motown. I love Gladys Knight & The Pips’ version of I Heard It Through The Grapevine, what do you think (in at 17:09)?

But I digress…

Coming back to today’s recipe, you can use white or sweet potato instead of yam. Substitute green peas with any other type of fresh beans or even dried beans. As for the aubergine, I used the small black variety but, again, you can use the type which is fresh and/or in season.

Will go well with roti, bread roll or even tortilla.

Ingredients

150 Grams purple yam

150 Grams aubergine

1 Cup Green peas

3-4 cloves Garlic

1 Cup fresh coriander

1 Tablespoon grated coconut (dessicated will also do)

1 Teaspoon carom seeds (ajwain)

1 Teaspoon asafoetida

1 Teaspoon turmeric powder

1 Tablespoon cumin powder

1 Tablespoon coriander powder

1 Tablespoon minced green chillies

1 Tablespoon grated ginger

Salt to taste

1 Tablespoon oil

Method

  1. Peel, wash and cube the purple yam into medium sized pieces.
  2. Wash the green peas.
  3. Wash and cube the aubergine and leave it in water to prevent it from turning black.
  4. Chop and wash the coriander leaves.
  5. Peel the garlic and lightly smash the cloves with the knife.
  6. Heat oil in a wok-like pan.
  7. Once it is hot, lower the heat to minimum and add the carom seeds followed by the asafoetida. Stir for 30 seconds.
  8. Add the smashed garlic cloves and beat them with the back of the spoon (they will break easily).
  9. Stir for a minute.
  10. Add the purple yam, aubergine, green peas along with half cup of water.
  11. Toss in the turmeric, ground coriander, ground cumin, chilli, ginger, coconut, coriander and salt to taste.
  12. Mix well, cover and cook for about 20 minutes.
  13. After 20 minutes, uncover to check whether the vegetables are cooked. If so, take off the stove. If not, cover and cook for 5 t o10 more minutes.
  14. Enjoy hot.

Red Rice Flakes with Cauliflower & Green Pea

Red Rice Pohe with Cauliflower & Green Pea

  • Servings: 1-2
  • Difficulty: easy
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Red Rice Pohe with Cauliflower & Green Peas

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Isn’t it amazing that you can eat a particular food all your life not knowing how it is made?

One of the many advantages of food blogging is the number of new things I learn on a regular basis.

When I sit down to write a post, I like to look up information about the dish or its key ingredients on the internet. Although most times this research is retrospective – after the meal has been cooked and consumed – it is still useful to know and share with fellow kooky cooks.

today’s recipe is one such example of new learning

Rice flakes are also known as flattened rice or beaten rice or pohe. For convenience’s sake, I will refer to them as pohe in this post.

Pohe is a staple across India and in Bangladesh and Nepal. It can be used in sweet and savoury dishes.

Till now, I had assumed that pohe was nothing but unprocessed rice which was beaten or flattened. Not so.

According to LiveStrong, “Rice flakes undergo more processing than any other type of rice. Processing begins by parboiling to partially cook the rice via steaming, followed by a process of rolling, flattening and finally, dehydration. The result is “rice” with a soft, mushy texture when cooked and a taste so mild it borders on bland.”

So pohe are processed after all which explains why they cook so fast. Have just experienced one of those “doh” moments!

Previously, I have posted an unconventional pohe recipe so today, I would like to share a traditional Maharashtrian one (except for my kooky addition of cauliflower and green pea) and also a simple trick to avoid lumpy pohe.

A friend told me that to ensure that your pohe doesn’t clump while cooking, put them dry in a colander, give the colander a good shake to rid the pohe of any floury bits, rinse them in the same colander and let them drain. I have been cooking my pohe this way ever since and each flake stays separate.

Today’s recipe was made using red rice pohe but you can use white or brown pohe or even try it with leftover boiled rice.

The list of ingredients may seem long but this is one of those quick cook meals.

Ingredients

1 Cup dry pohe

1/2 Cup green pea

1/2 Cup chopped cauliflower (including leaves and stalk if tender)

2 Onions

10-15 Fresh curry leaves

1 Cup fresh coriander

2-3 Green chillies

A piece of fresh ginger the size of your thumb

2 Tablespoons grated coconut

1 Teaspoon mustard seeds

1 Teaspoon cumin seeds

1 Teaspoon asafoetida

1 Teaspoon turmeric powder

2 Tablespoons raw peanuts

Juice of a lime or lemon

1 Tablespoon oil

Salt to taste

Method

  1. Put the pohe in a colander. Give the colander a good shake and rinse the pohe under running water.
  2. Set aside and make sure there is enough space between the bottom of the colander and the kitchen platform for any excess water to drain away.
  3. Wash green pea and cauliflower.
  4. Peel, wash and finely chop the onion.
  5. Wash the curry leaves.
  6. Chop and wash the fresh coriander.
  7. Wash and finely slice the chilli.
  8. Peel, wash and grate the ginger.
  9. Heat oil in a wok-like pan.
  10. Lower the heat and add mustard seeds and once they start crackling, add cumin seeds.
  11. Next, add the asafoetida, peanuts and curry leaves.
  12. Stir for about a minute or so.
  13. Add the chopped onions, chilli and grated ginger.
  14. Sprinkle turmeric powder and salt to taste.
  15. Cover and cook on low flame for 5 to 7 minutes till the onion turns translucent.
  16. Add green pea, cauliflower and lemon juice.
  17. Once again, mix well, cover and cook for about 5 to 7 minutes. At the end of this cooking stage, you want the cauliflower a little undercooked. It should have some bite to it because it will be cooking a bit more once the pohe have been added.
  18. Next, add the pohe, coriander and coconut to the vegetable mixture.
  19. Mix well, cover and cook for about 8 to 10 minutes.
  20. Serve hot.

Note:

  1. You can adjust the quantity of green chilli and lemon juice according to personal preference.
  2. If you can’t get hold of fresh coconut, use dessicated coconut.

A Curry of Fresh Legumes, Aubergine & Ridge Gourd, The Indian Way

A Curry of Fresh Legumes, Aubergine & Ridge Gourd, The Indian Way

  • Servings: 2-3
  • Difficulty: easy
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A Curry of Fresh Legumes, Aubergine & Ridgegourd, The Indian Way

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I am always fascinated by the fresh equivalent of dry foods we use on a day to day basis.

Tea Plantation, MunnarFor instance, I saw tea plantations for the first time during my visit to Munnar in Kerala a couple of years back and kept wondering about the stark contrast between the fresh green leaves and their dry powdered equivalent. One of the plantations, the Kanan Devan Hills Plantations Company, has a Tea Museum which demonstrates this very interesting process. Kerala is well known for its spices and I was fortunate enough to also see peppercorns, cardamom and nutmeg in their “fresh” form.

Fresh Kidney BeansIn terms of legumes in their green avatar (technically referred to as immature), I have had sorghum (ponk), peanut, chickpea and kidney bean. I was introduced to immature kidney bean last year. Its outer pod is very light green in colour and the bean itself is pale white with specks of red (as seen in the photo on the left). The bean is large in size and some even sprout in the pod.

Star attractions of today’s recipe are fresh kidney beans, fresh chickpeas, fresh green peas, two varieties of aubergine (green and purple) and ridge gourd (also known as luffa, Chinese okra and Vietnamese gourd).

Not sure why but fresh legumes don’t feel heavy and are easy to digest.

The recipe itself is straightforward and requires very few spices.

healthy, delicious and light on the stomach

If you would like to try this curry and can’t get hold of the immature legumes mentioned here, you can substitute with any other types of legume like fresh broad bean, edamame or lima bean. Ridge gourd is easily available in Asian grocery stores.

This curry goes well with, both, rice and bread (roti, naan, paratha, bread rolls or even hunk of fresh bread).

Ingredients

1/2 Cup shelled fresh kidney beans

1/2 Cup shelled fresh chickpeas

1/2 Cup shelled fresh green peas

1 Green aubergine

1 Purple aubergine

1 Ridgegourd

1/2 Cup fresh coriander

1 Tablespoon coriander powder

1 Tablespoon cumin powder

1 Teaspoon turmeric powder

1-2 Green chillies

Fresh ginger the size of your thumb

1 Tablespoon oil

1 Tablespoon carom seeds

1 Teaspoon asafoetida

Salt to taste

Method

    1. Wash the fresh legume.
    2. Wash and mince the chillies.
    3. Peel, wash and mince the ginger.
    4. Chop and wash the fresh coriander.
    5. Heat the oil in a cooking pot.
    6. When it becomes hot, lower the flame to minimum setting and throw in the carom seeds.
    7. Add the asafoetida, stir for a few seconds and tip in the washed legumes.
    8. Add salt, cumin powder, coriander powder, turmeric powder, minced chillies and minced ginger along with about 2 cups of water.
    9. Mix well, cover and let the legumes cook for about 10 minutes.
    10. While they are cooking, wash and dice the aubergine.
    11. Scrape, wash and chop the ridge gourd.
    12. After 10 minutes, add the chopped aubergine and ridge gourd.
    13. Stir, cover and cook for about 15 minutes till the vegetables are tender and legumes fully cooked.
    14. Garnish with fresh coriander and serve.

Note:

  1. If you are a garlic fan, you can add a couple of cloves of freshly grated garlic just before serving.

Kohlrabi & Fresh Green Chickpea Idada/White Dhokla of Kohlrabi & Fresh Green Chickpea

Savoury Steamed Kohlrabi & Fresh Green Chickpea Cake

  • Servings: 1-2
  • Difficulty: easy
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Savoury Steamed Kohlrabi & Fresh Green Chickpea Cake

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I have talked about the well known Gujarati dish idada in  one of my previous posts when I had made them with cabbage.

Idada are very healthy because they are made from fermented batter and steamed. Fermented foods have many health benefits and are often overlooked in most people’s diets.

in today’s kooky version, I have added a couple of vegetables to up the nutritional quota

My previous idada experiment was so successful that I decided to replicate it with kohlrabi and fresh green chickpeas, both of which are currently in season.

Kohlrabi & Fresh Green Chickpeas for IdadaWhen I had last cooked with kohlrabi (green pea and kohlrabi cake), I had decided to buy the vegetable whenever I saw it.

As for the fresh green chickpeas, they are very nice to look at and cook with but a pain to shell.

So imagine my delight when I chanced upon a greengrocer selling both (the fact that he was selling shelled chickpeas was a bonus!).

As you can see from the above photo, the kohlrabi leaves were very fresh and so I decided to include them as well.

At first, I thought I would coarsely grind the chickpeas in a food processor before adding them to the batter but then I decided to throw them in whole.

If you would like to make these, you can either use ready idli batter (in the UK, ready batter is available in many Indian grocers) or you can soak the rice and lentils, grind them and ferment them. As it is still a bit cold where we are, I used my ‘fermenting in cold climate‘ method to  get the batter to rise. It took nearly 48 hours for this process to happen.

if you use instant idli batter, these can be made in a jiffy

If you can’t get hold of fresh green chickpeas, you can use green peas instead.

The following method is using ready idli batter. If you would like to soak, grind and ferment, please go here for instructions and quantity.

Ingredients

1 Cup idli batter

1 Kohlrabi

1/2 Cup fresh green chickpeas (or green peas)

2-3 Green chillies

Fresh ginger, size of your thumb

Salt to taste

1-2 Teaspoons coarsely ground black peppercorns

1 Tablespoon oil

Method

  1. First prep the kohlrabi. Discard any tough stems and keep the fresh leaves.
  2. Peel the kohlrabi with a regular knife, The skin will come off very easily.
  3. Wash and finely grate the kohlrabi.
  4. Wash and finely chop its leaves.
  5. Wash the fresh chickpeas or green peas.
  6. Wash and mince the chilli.
  7. Peel, wash and mince the ginger.
  8. To the idli batter, add the grated kohlrabi, chopped leaves, chickpeas/green peas, chilli, ginger and salt to taste.
  9. Grease a cake like tin with half tablespoon oil and pour the batter in it.
  10. Evenly sprinkle coarsely ground peppercorns across the surface of the batter.
  11. Steam for about 45 minutes.
  12. Once cooked, remove from the steamer and drizzle the remaining oil (and a bit more if you like).
  13. Let the idada sit for about 3 to 4 minutes before cutting in square or diamond shape and serving.

Note:

  1. To check for doneness, insert a knife or a toothpick, it if comes out clean you know that they are cooked.

Batter for Kohlrabi & Fresh Green Chickpea IdadaThis is how my batter looked waiting to be steamed.

delicious with some green or red chutney

Panchkutiyu Shaak II/Seven Vegetables Cooked in Coriander, Coconut & Green Garlic

Panchkutiyu Shaak II/Seven Vegetables Cooked in Coriander, Coconut & Green Garlic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Statistics tell me that Panchkutiyu Shaak is one of the most viewed posts on Kooky Cookyng. While this is good to know, am not sure what the reason could be.

So here I am sharing with you another version of this famous Gujarati vegetable dish which is a bit different from the previous one I have posted.

a very healthy and delicious recipe which can become a dinner party scene stealer

For starters, panchkutiyu means five [vegetables] whereas this particular recipe uses seven different vegetables. Also unlike the other recipe, in this one green garlic is optional and I have added muthiya (although you can do away with them if you like).

can qualify as an easier, non-seasonal, version of undhiyu

This particular recipe can be cooked any time of the year using seasonal flat beans (papdi).

The following should be good enough for 4 people. Goes very well with rotis. Any leftover tastes even better.

Ingredients

250 Grams flat beans (papdi) of your choice

500 Grams purple yam

125 Grams potato

125 Grams sweet potato

125 Grams aubergine (any variety will do)

1 Bottlegourd

2 Cups shelled green peas

2 Cups freshly grated coconut

2 Cups fresh coriander

250 Grams green garlic (optional)

6 Muthiyas of your choice, steamed and sliced (optional)

2 Tablespoons oil

1 Tablespoon carom seeds (ajwain)

1 Tablespoon asafoetida

2 Tablespoons cumin powder

2 Tablespoons coriander powder

1 Tablespoon turmeric powder

2 Tablespoons minced chillies

2 Tablespoons minced ginger

1 Teaspoon bicarbonate of soda

Salt to taste

Method

  1. First prepare the masala mixture. Chop and wash the coriander.
  2. Clean, chop and wash the green garlic (if using).
  3. Take a large mixing bowl in which you need to add the grated coconut, coriander leaves, garlic, cumin powder, coriander powder, turmeric powder, minced chillies, minced ginger and salt to taste.
  4. Mix this with a spoon or hands, whichever is easier. Set aside.
  5. Next, work on the vegetables. Top and tail the flat beans and split them open. If very long, you can snap them in two else leave them whole.
  6. Peel, cut and wash purple yam.
  7. Cut and wash potato.
  8. Cut and wash sweet potato.
  9. Peel, wash and cut bottle gourd.
  10. Wash and cut the aubergine.
  11. Mix the bicarbonate of soda and half of the coriander-coconut mix to the flat beans and set aside.
  12. Combine the remaining vegetables (purple yam, potato, sweet potato, green peas, bottle gourd and aubergine) and add the remaining coriander-coconut mix. Toss the vegetables around so that they are evenly coated with the masala.
  13. Take a large cooking pot which has a tight fitting lid.
  14. Place it on high heat and pour oil.
  15. Once the oil is hot, add the carom seeds. As soon as they start spluttering, add the asafoetida.
  16. Add the papdi and stir well.
  17. Next, add the remaining six vegetables and mix them with the papdi.
  18. Place the sliced muthiya on top of the vegetables.
  19. Pour two cups of water and cover the mouth of the pot with a foil so that steam doesn’t escape easily.
  20. Now cover with the tight fitting lid, lower heat and let the vegetables cook on very low heat for 2 hours. Do not open in between. The vegetables shouldn’t stick to the bottom as we have sealed the mouth of the pot plus added 2 cups of water plus the vegetables like bottle gourd and aubergine will release their own moisture.
  21. Once the vegetables start cooking, you will get the aroma.
  22. After 2 hours, take the cooking pot off the heat and let it sit for 15 minutes.
  23. Remove the lid and open the foil. Mix the muthiya with the vegetables and check for doneness.
  24. Serve hot.

Note:

  1. Cut the vegetables into large chunks so that they do not break or dissolve while cooking.
  2. If the vegetables are not fully cooked after two hours, put the foil and the lid back and cook for additional 15 to 20 minutes. If you feel the need to add more water at this stage, make sure that you add boiling water (not room temperature).

 

Amaranth Seed, Kidney Bean & Green Pea Cakes

Amaranth Seed, Kidney Bean & Green Pea Cakes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Firstly, apologies for no proper, plated photo. These cakes had been waiting patiently to be served and by the time their turn came, it was all too hurried so there was no real opportunity. I am new to food blogging and am still trying to get to grips with cooking, serving and photographing, all simultaneously!

Yesterday morning, I had boiled amaranth seeds to make these cakes and then came upon this article in Mumbai Boss which extols their virtues; talk about serendipity!

Amaranth Seeds, Kidney Beans & Green PeasMy original plan was to make fish cakes using these seeds (substituting the traditional mashed potatoes). But I decided to use kidney beans instead.

The end result – most delicious cakes which are very similar to fish cakes in texture, requiring surprisingly very little oil and totally moreish.

amaranth seeds may be tiny but they can hold their own against other ingredients

This recipe does require a bit of patience and advance planning if you are going to soak and boil kidney beans.

Amaranth seeds, kidney beans, green peas and spring onions bound together by semolina are very delicate to handle and as you are shallow frying these cakes, you may start wondering if they will ever form a nice crust. But as I discovered, patience pays and if you let them cook for a long time, they will become nice and crunchy on the outside while remaining moist on the inside.

This is the second time I have used amaranth seeds in this way. And am feeling much more confident about how to use them in the future.

The following makes about 15 to 18 cakes depending on their size.

Ingredients

1 Cup amaranth seeds

1 Cup kidney beans

1 Cup green peas

1 Large bunch spring onions (about 10 bulbs)

2-3 Red chillies (adjust quantity according to taste)

1 Tablespoon sumac* (adjust quantity according to taste)

1 Vegetable stock cube

3 Cups water

Salt to taste

1 Tablespoon olive oil

Semolina to dust the cakes (approximately 1/2 cup but you may need more so keep it handy)

Method

  1. First, prep the kidney beans (if using canned, ignore this step). Soak them for 10 to 12 hours and then boil them in some salted water till they are very soft.
  2. Next, cook the amaranth seeds. I used this website as a guide as to how much water I should use. The ratio of 1:3 (1 part amaranth seeds, 3 parts water) works perfectly. So, put the amaranth seeds in a saucepan along with the stock cube and 3 cups of water. Cover, bring to boil, lower heat and let the seeds cook for 30 minutes. You don’t need to stir. Once the seeds are cooked, take them off the heat.
  3. Wash and steam the green peas till tender.
  4. Wash and finely dice the spring onions. For this recipe, you only take the white bulb, not the green stalk.
  5. Finely chop the red chillies.
  6. Pour the semolina in a flat plate.
  7. In a big mixing bowl, tip in the boiled kidney beans, amaranth seeds, green peas, chopped spring onion, chillies, sumac and salt to taste. Bring everything together using your hands (it is easier than a spoon).
  8. Grease you palms with a few drops of oil and make small cakes of the mixture. Place these cakes in the plate which has semolina. Turn each cake so that it is completely covered in semolina.
  9. Once you have shaped all the cakes, put them in the refrigerator for a couple of hours.
  10. When you are ready to cook the cakes, remove them from the refrigerator. Dust them with more semolina if you feel the need. I did this and they formed a nice crust.
  11. Take a frying pan and grease it with a little bit of oil. You will need to use your judgement as to how much oil you require. I used half a tablespoon and it was more than enough.
  12. Heat the oiled frying pan. Once it is hot, very gently place the cakes making sure that they do not touch each other. You will need the space in between them to flip them over.
  13. Let the cakes cook on low heat for about 10 minutes before turning them over with a palette knife or a spatula.
  14. Cook the other side for 10 minutes. Once again flip them over.
  15. Continue cooking each side for 10 minutes till you can see and feel the crust form. Any bits of semolina in the pan will also turn dark brown (as you can see from my photo above).
  16. Once the cakes are cooked and the outside is firm and crunchy, transfer them to a serving plate.
  17. Serve with tomato ketchup or hot sauce.

Note:

  1. If you don’t have sumac, you can use the juice of one lime or lemon instead.
  2. The uncooked cakes are very soft so be very gentle as to how you handle them when placing them on the frying pan and during cooking (when turning them over).
  3. Don’t worry if they break a bit. Once they form the crust, they will become firm.
  4. I found the second dusting of semolina (after taking them out of the refrigerator and putting them in a frying pan) helped.

 

Marmite Spaghetti, The Kooky Way

Marmite Spaghetti, The Kooky Way

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“First, I would like to thank my new blogger friend Teagan of Teagan’s Books for inspiring me to get into the kitchen for Nigella’s Spaghetti with Marmite. On her blog, Teagan has started Three Ingredients Serial which she describes as “a sort of culinary mystery”. Each new episode features three ingredients sent in by her readers. The latest episode features my favourite marmite by way of Nigella’s spaghetti recipe. As soon as I read it, I was like “I have got to make that”.”

“Which brings me to my second thank you of the night, my sister who had first told me about Nigella’s Spaghetti with Marmite. At that time as well, I was like “oh, I must make that” and had even bookmarked the page from Nigella’s website but never got around to it till I read Teagan’s latest episode.”

“Teagan and my sister, without you both, this post may not have come so thank you.”

MarmiteYes, yes, I am prepping you for the forthcoming Oscars and speeches galore :-). So now I stop my speech and I get off my faux Oscar stage to tell you about one of THE most easiest, THE most delicious and THE most memorable spaghetti dinners I have ever cooked (seriously, thanks to Teagan and my sister).

I am really and truly kicking myself as to why I did not make this any sooner

I know that marmite is one of those foods which those who have eaten either love of hate. I belong to the love camp as you can see by the industrial size marmite jar I have in my kitchen!

but I am pretty sure that even those who are not marmite-converts would like this spaghetti

As you can see by the photo, I have improvised Nigella’s recipe which is simply spaghetti, butter and marmite.

Yesterday, I had a pretty long and hectic day with no time for lunch and, therefore, I wanted to add some vegetables to the spaghetti to make the dinner more balanced and nutritious. I decided to pair the original recipe with mushrooms and green peas as I felt that they would work well with marmite. Also, I was out of spaghetti so used linguine (same thing to my mind although some purists may disagree). And the experiment totally worked.

So here’s my kooky version of Nigella’s Spaghetti with Marmite.

Ingredients

70-85 Grams dry spaghetti or linguine

200 Grams mushrooms

1/2 Cup green peas

1 Onion

2 Fresh red chillies

1 Tablespoon marmite

1 Tablespoon olive oil

Salt to taste

Freshly grated Parmesan (1 tablespoon to cook and some extra to serve)

Method

  1. Boil the spaghetti/linguine according to instructions on the packet. Drain and set aside.
  2. Also set aside about half cup of water from the drained spaghetti, you will need it later.
  3. Wash/wipe and slice the mushroom.
  4. Peel, wash and slice the onion.
  5. Wash the green peas.
  6. Wash and finely slice the red chilli.
  7. Dilute marmite in the half cup reserved water.
  8. Add the olive oil, sliced onion, chill and a pinch of salt in a wide based pan.
  9. Put the pan on low heat, cover and let the onions cook for 5 to 7 minutes.
  10. Uncover, throw in the peas, cover and cook for 5 minutes.
  11. Uncover, add the mushroom and marmite mixed with water. Stir, cover and cook for about 5 minutes.
  12. Uncover, add the boiled spaghetti/linguine and 1 tablespoon of Parmesan cheese. Mix well, check for salt, add more if needed, cover and cook for 3 to 4 minutes.
  13. Transfer to a pasta bowl and eat hot with a generous sprinkling of Parmesan.

heavenly with a glass of full bodied red wine