Tag Archives: Aubergine

Baingan Bharta/Smoked Aubergine, The Indian Way

Baingan Bharta/Smoked Aubergine, The Indian Way

  • Servings: 1-2
  • Time: 40mins
  • Difficulty: easy
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Baingan Bharta/Smoked Aubergine, The Indian Way

 

 

 

 

 

 

I think age is catching up on me because I often find myself checking my own blog to see whether I have posted a particular recipe! As was the case with today’s one and I cannot believe that having been blogging for nearly a year now, I have not written about one of my favourite Indian vegetable preparations.

baingan bharta is an ode to all aubergine lovers, or so I like to think

Smoked aubergine cooked with onions, tomato and garlic for a velvety, delicious vegetable which can be scooped with any type of bread or equally divine on some plain boiled rice – what is there not to like?!

Earlier, I used to smoke the aubergine directly on a gas burner as is. But I have recently discovered that if you oil it a bit, it truly imparts that smokey aroma and flavour. If you don’t have a gas burner, you can try it on a grill although I can’t vouch for the end result in terms of smokiness.

When choosing an aubergine for baingan bharta, go for one which doesn’t weigh too much (irrespective of size). The heavy ones have more seeds in them.

Ingredients

1 Medium size aubergine

2 Onion

1 Head of garlic

2 Tomato

2-3 Fresh green chilli

Fresh ginger the size of your thumb

1/2 Cup fresh coriander

1-2 Teaspoons cumin seeds

1 Teaspoon turmeric

1 Teaspoon chilli powder

1 Teaspoon garam masala

1 Tablespoon oil

Salt to taste

Method

  1. Wash the aubergine and apply a bit of oil all over.
  2. Place the aubergine on a gas burner and cook it till its skin is charred and the vegetable softens about 90% (you don’t want it completely collapsing). This does become slightly messy so be prepared to clean the burner afterwards!
  3. As soon as the aubergine is almost cooked on the open flame, transfer it to an airtight container. This way, it will cook in its own steam a bit more.
  4. In the meantime, peel, wash and dice the onion.
  5. Peel and chop the garlic.
  6. Wash and slice the green chilli.
  7. Peel, wash and grate the ginger.
  8. Wash, chop and dry the fresh coriander.
  9. Heat the oil in a frying pan.
  10. When the oil becomes hot, lower the heat and add the cumin seeds.
  11. As soon as they stop spluttering, throw in the onion, garlic, tomato, green chilli and ginger.
  12. Add turmeric powder, chilli powder and salt to taste. Mix well.
  13. Cover and cook for 10 minutes.
  14. While the onion mixture is cooking, go back to the aubergine.
  15. Remove the charred skin and roughly chop the flesh.
  16. Once the 10 minutes are up, uncover the pan and add the aubergine and garam masala powder. Mix well.
  17. Cover and cook for 5 minutes.
  18. Take off the heat and let it rest for 5 minutes.
  19. Add the fresh coriander before serving.

Mixed Sprouts & Smoked Aubergine Burger

Mixed Sprouts & Smoked Aubergine Burger

  • Time: 60mins
  • Difficulty: easy
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Mixed Sprouts & Smoked Aubergine Burger

 

 

 

 

 

necessity is the mother of invention

Whoever thought up this proverb must have had the foresight of these burgers.

I had some mixed sprout (a combination of chickpea, black eyed beans, wheat, fenugreek, peas and moong beans)  which I decided to incorporate into this totally kooky recipe of mine.

The idea was to bind everything with some mashed sweet potato but when I boiled the tuber in a pressure cooker, it was not fully cooked. I cooked it again only to discover that it was a bad ‘un which went straight into the dustbin. Had no time to boil another one so decided to throw in some rice flakes (pohe) instead.

A mixture of steamed mixed sprouts, smoked aubergine, carrot and pumpkin gets you these super delicious burgers.

The ingredients may sounds odd but they actually work very well together.

Enjoy them with some grilled/stir-fried/steamed vegetables.

Ingredients

1 Cup mixed sprouts (or any sprouts of your choice)

1 Medium size aubergine

1 Large carrot

250 Grams pumpkin

2 Onions

1 Head garlic

4-5 Bird’s eye chilli

Handful of fresh basil leaves

1 Cup rice flakes

2 Tablespoons dry roasted pinenut

1 Tablespoon sumac

1 Tablespoon smoked or plain paprika

1 Egg

3-4 Tablespoons quick cooking (instant) oats

1 Tablespoon olive oil

Salt to taste

Method

  1. Steam the sprouts till tender but with a bite to them.
  2. Either grill the aubergine or smoke it on a gas burner.
  3. Once cool, peel the skin and remove the flesh.
  4. Wash and coarsely grate the carrot.
  5. Peel, wash and coarsely grate the pumpkin.
  6. Peel, wash and finely chop the onion.
  7. Peel and chop the garlic.
  8. Wash and slice the chilli.
  9. Wash and tear the basil leaves.
  10. Heat a drop of oil in a frying pan and cook the onion, garlic and chilli along with a pinch of salt.
  11. Let the onion mixture cook for about 5 minutes. Take off the heat and cool.
  12. In a large mixing bowl, throw in the sprouts, aubergine, carrot, pumpkin, onion mixture, sumac, paprika, pinenut, rice flakes, egg and salt to taste.
  13. Shape this mixture into oval or round.
  14. Crumble the oats with your hands and coat each burger in the oat crumbs.
  15. Refrigerate for 2 to 3 hours.
  16. Heat the oil in a frying pan and fry the burgers, 10 minutes each side.
  17. Enjoy hot or warm. Leftover can be frozen.

Aubergine, String Beans & Black Chickpea, The Indian Way

Baingan, Chawli Beans Aur Kala Chana

  • Servings: 2-3
  • Time: 8hrs soaking 60mins cooking
  • Difficulty: easy
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Aubergine, String Beans & Black Chickpea, The Indian Way

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My flatmate friend has just returned from a visit to her parents. Her mother has green fingers and successfully grows plenty of vegetables, fruits and flowers in their garden as well as a large terrace balcony.

This time round, some aubergine were brought back. They were quite unusual looking, pale violet, hefty bulbs.

The original idea was to make baingan bharta with the addition of some black chickpea (kala chana) and, to that end, I had even soaked some of the legume. But when it came to cooking time, I felt that the aubergine were more suited to a curry and so I literally made up the following recipe as I went along, with whatever was found in the cupboard and refrigerator.

the end result was totally yummy and satisfying

Goes very well with, both, rice and bread.

Don’t be put off by the amount of garlic – it makes all the difference to the dish.

Ingredients

1 Cup dry black chickpea (kala chana)*

150 Grams aubergine

250 Grams string beans (chawli beans)

2 Ripe tomato

1 Cup fresh coriander

2 Heads of garlic

2 Tablespoons freshly grated coconut

2 Tablespoons powder of roasted peanut

1-2 Teaspoons paste of ginger and green chilli

1-2 Teaspoons carom seeds

A large pinch of asafoetida

1 Teaspoon turmeric powder

1 Tablespoon coriander powder

1 Tablespoon cumin powder

Salt to taste

1 Tablespoon oil

Method

  1. Soak the black chickpea for 8 hours.
  2. Add a pinch of salt and boil them till tender. You can either do this in a pressure cooker or over the stove.
  3. Drain and keep aside. Reserve the cooking liquor.
  4. Chop and wash the string beans.
  5. Peel and slice the garlic along its length.
  6. Wash and dice the tomato.
  7. Chop and wash the coriander.
  8. Dice the aubergine and leave it covered in water.
  9. Heat the oil in a wok like pan.
  10. When it is hot, lower the heat and add the carom seeds followed by asafoetida.
  11. Stir for 30 seconds.
  12. Add the chopped string beans along with about a cup of the chickpea cooking liquor and salt to taste.
  13. Cover and cook for 5 minutes.
  14. Next, add the aubergine, ginger-green chilli paste, turmeric powder, coriander powder and cumin powder.
  15. Mix well, cover and cook for about 10 minutes.
  16. Uncover and throw in the cooked black chickpea, diced tomato, grated coconut and powdered peanut.
  17. Cover and cook for 5 to 10 minutes till the vegetables are tender.
  18. Stir in the coriander and serve hot.

Note:

  1. You can use canned chickpea if you prefer. You can also substitute chickpea with any other type of dry beans.

Purple Yam, Aubergine & Green Pea Curry

Purple Yam, Aubergine & Green Pea Curry

  • Servings: 2
  • Time: 45mins
  • Difficulty: easy
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Purple Yam, Aubergine & Green Pea Curry

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As summer peaks its head from around the corner, it is time to say au revoir to green garlic, fresh turmeric and purple yam.

here is a quick, simple and delicious vegetable curry which is easily adaptable to what’s available or in your kitchen

I made it in under an hour while enjoying The Soul Of Motown. I love Gladys Knight & The Pips’ version of I Heard It Through The Grapevine, what do you think (in at 17:09)?

But I digress…

Coming back to today’s recipe, you can use white or sweet potato instead of yam. Substitute green peas with any other type of fresh beans or even dried beans. As for the aubergine, I used the small black variety but, again, you can use the type which is fresh and/or in season.

Will go well with roti, bread roll or even tortilla.

Ingredients

150 Grams purple yam

150 Grams aubergine

1 Cup Green peas

3-4 cloves Garlic

1 Cup fresh coriander

1 Tablespoon grated coconut (dessicated will also do)

1 Teaspoon carom seeds (ajwain)

1 Teaspoon asafoetida

1 Teaspoon turmeric powder

1 Tablespoon cumin powder

1 Tablespoon coriander powder

1 Tablespoon minced green chillies

1 Tablespoon grated ginger

Salt to taste

1 Tablespoon oil

Method

  1. Peel, wash and cube the purple yam into medium sized pieces.
  2. Wash the green peas.
  3. Wash and cube the aubergine and leave it in water to prevent it from turning black.
  4. Chop and wash the coriander leaves.
  5. Peel the garlic and lightly smash the cloves with the knife.
  6. Heat oil in a wok-like pan.
  7. Once it is hot, lower the heat to minimum and add the carom seeds followed by the asafoetida. Stir for 30 seconds.
  8. Add the smashed garlic cloves and beat them with the back of the spoon (they will break easily).
  9. Stir for a minute.
  10. Add the purple yam, aubergine, green peas along with half cup of water.
  11. Toss in the turmeric, ground coriander, ground cumin, chilli, ginger, coconut, coriander and salt to taste.
  12. Mix well, cover and cook for about 20 minutes.
  13. After 20 minutes, uncover to check whether the vegetables are cooked. If so, take off the stove. If not, cover and cook for 5 t o10 more minutes.
  14. Enjoy hot.

Ratatouille, The Kooky Way

Ratatouille, The Kooky Way

  • Servings: 1-2
  • Time: 45mins
  • Difficulty: easy
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Ratatouille

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There is an interesting news story doing the rounds about how angry French chefs want people to stop taking photos of food in their restaurants.

According to Alexandre Gauthier, chef at La Grenouillere in the northern town of La Madelaine-sous-Montreuil, “with each dish it’s ‘stop everything’, or the photo has to be retaken three times. It’s Tweeted, liked, comments are made and replied to — by then the dish is cold.”

Although this may sound strange coming from a food blogger, I have to admit that I agree with Mr. Gauthier and his colleagues.

I know that this goes against the widely held belief that food blogs should have delicious looking photos in order to attract visitors but, somehow, I don’t subscribe to that view.

Personally, I truly enjoy the process of thinking up a recipe, planning my dinner, cooking, eating and sharing the experience here but photographing the final dish is the task I least like and look forward to.

By the time the food is plated, I want to eat it, not spend hours trying to get the lighting and the background and the props and everything else right. If I were to do that, my food would be stone cold!

The reason I am writing this is because the article struck a chord when I prepared this ratatouille last night. Once it was cooked, I tried taking several photos of the final dish but they just wouldn’t come out right. And the rice was getting cold… In the end, I got so fed up that I sat down to eat. The photo above was taken this morning of the leftover stew :-).

Herbs for RatatouilleVegetables for RatatouilleWhat defines a recipe and when can a dish no longer be called by its original name are the two thoughts which kept going through my mind when I was cooking this dinner.

Traditionally, ratatouille is made of onion, garlic, tomato, aubergine, pepper and courgette along with Herbes de Provence or a mix of basil, marjoram and thyme.

In my kooky version, I used a yellow courgette instead of the green one and cooked with two types of aubergine, neither of which are European varieties.

As for the herbs, I added some dried sage, rosemary, thyme and tarragon along with fresh basil.

the end result is a really satisfying and pleasing “ratatouille”

I had mine with some brown rice. It would also go well with couscous or some crusty bread.

Ingredients

1 Aubergine

1 Green Pepper

1 Courgette

2 Tomatoes

2 Onions

1 Head of garlic

3 to 4 Tablespoons tomato puree

1-2 Teaspoons herbes de provence OR a mix of dried herbs you have

12-15 Fresh basil leaves

1 Tablespoon olive oil

Salt to taste

Method

  1. Peel, wash and chop the onion.
  2. Peel and slice the garlic.
  3. Heat oil in a frying pan to which add the onion and garlic with a pinch of salt.
  4. Lower heat and cover.
  5. While the onion and garlic are cooking, wash and dice the tomatoes.
  6. Uncover and add the chopped tomatoes, tomato puree and herbs. Mix well and cover.
  7. Next, de-seed, de-core and chop the green pepper.
  8. Add it to the onion tomato mixture. Once again mix and cover.
  9. Now, wash and dice the courgette into bite size pieces.
  10. Add it to the vegetables being cooked, mix and cover.
  11. Lastly, wash and chop the aubergine into same size as courgette.
  12. Add the aubergine to the stew, add some more salt, mix well and cover.
  13. Cook for about 20 minutes till the vegetables are tender.
  14. Serve hot.

A Curry of Fresh Legumes, Aubergine & Ridge Gourd, The Indian Way

A Curry of Fresh Legumes, Aubergine & Ridge Gourd, The Indian Way

  • Servings: 2-3
  • Time: 45mins
  • Difficulty: easy
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A Curry of Fresh Legumes, Aubergine & Ridgegourd, The Indian Way

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I am always fascinated by the fresh equivalent of dry foods we use on a day to day basis.

Tea Plantation, MunnarFor instance, I saw tea plantations for the first time during my visit to Munnar in Kerala a couple of years back and kept wondering about the stark contrast between the fresh green leaves and their dry powdered equivalent. One of the plantations, the Kanan Devan Hills Plantations Company, has a Tea Museum which demonstrates this very interesting process. Kerala is well known for its spices and I was fortunate enough to also see peppercorns, cardamom and nutmeg in their “fresh” form.

Fresh Kidney BeansIn terms of legumes in their green avatar (technically referred to as immature), I have had sorghum (ponk), peanut, chickpea and kidney bean. I was introduced to immature kidney bean last year. Its outer pod is very light green in colour and the bean itself is pale white with specks of red (as seen in the photo on the left). The bean is large in size and some even sprout in the pod.

Star attractions of today’s recipe are fresh kidney beans, fresh chickpeas, fresh green peas, two varieties of aubergine (green and purple) and ridge gourd (also known as luffa, Chinese okra and Vietnamese gourd).

Not sure why but fresh legumes don’t feel heavy and are easy to digest.

The recipe itself is straightforward and requires very few spices.

healthy, delicious and light on the stomach

If you would like to try this curry and can’t get hold of the immature legumes mentioned here, you can substitute with any other types of legume like fresh broad bean, edamame or lima bean. Ridge gourd is easily available in Asian grocery stores.

This curry goes well with, both, rice and bread (roti, naan, paratha, bread rolls or even hunk of fresh bread).

Ingredients

1/2 Cup shelled fresh kidney beans

1/2 Cup shelled fresh chickpeas

1/2 Cup shelled fresh green peas

1 Green aubergine

1 Purple aubergine

1 Ridgegourd

1/2 Cup fresh coriander

1 Tablespoon coriander powder

1 Tablespoon cumin powder

1 Teaspoon turmeric powder

1-2 Green chillies

Fresh ginger the size of your thumb

1 Tablespoon oil

1 Tablespoon carom seeds

1 Teaspoon asafoetida

Salt to taste

Method

    1. Wash the fresh legume.
    2. Wash and mince the chillies.
    3. Peel, wash and mince the ginger.
    4. Chop and wash the fresh coriander.
    5. Heat the oil in a cooking pot.
    6. When it becomes hot, lower the flame to minimum setting and throw in the carom seeds.
    7. Add the asafoetida, stir for a few seconds and tip in the washed legumes.
    8. Add salt, cumin powder, coriander powder, turmeric powder, minced chillies and minced ginger along with about 2 cups of water.
    9. Mix well, cover and let the legumes cook for about 10 minutes.
    10. While they are cooking, wash and dice the aubergine.
    11. Scrape, wash and chop the ridge gourd.
    12. After 10 minutes, add the chopped aubergine and ridge gourd.
    13. Stir, cover and cook for about 15 minutes till the vegetables are tender and legumes fully cooked.
    14. Garnish with fresh coriander and serve.

Note:

  1. If you are a garlic fan, you can add a couple of cloves of freshly grated garlic just before serving.

Panchkutiyu Shaak II/Seven Vegetables Cooked in Coriander, Coconut & Green Garlic

Panchkutiyu Shaak II/Seven Vegetables Cooked in Coriander, Coconut & Green Garlic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Statistics tell me that Panchkutiyu Shaak is one of the most viewed posts on Kooky Cookyng. While this is good to know, am not sure what the reason could be.

So here I am sharing with you another version of this famous Gujarati vegetable dish which is a bit different from the previous one I have posted.

a very healthy and delicious recipe which can become a dinner party scene stealer

For starters, panchkutiyu means five [vegetables] whereas this particular recipe uses seven different vegetables. Also unlike the other recipe, in this one green garlic is optional and I have added muthiya (although you can do away with them if you like).

can qualify as an easier, non-seasonal, version of undhiyu

This particular recipe can be cooked any time of the year using seasonal flat beans (papdi).

The following should be good enough for 4 people. Goes very well with rotis. Any leftover tastes even better.

Ingredients

250 Grams flat beans (papdi) of your choice

500 Grams purple yam

125 Grams potato

125 Grams sweet potato

125 Grams aubergine (any variety will do)

1 Bottlegourd

2 Cups shelled green peas

2 Cups freshly grated coconut

2 Cups fresh coriander

250 Grams green garlic (optional)

6 Muthiyas of your choice, steamed and sliced (optional)

2 Tablespoons oil

1 Tablespoon carom seeds (ajwain)

1 Tablespoon asafoetida

2 Tablespoons cumin powder

2 Tablespoons coriander powder

1 Tablespoon turmeric powder

2 Tablespoons minced chillies

2 Tablespoons minced ginger

1 Teaspoon bicarbonate of soda

Salt to taste

Method

  1. First prepare the masala mixture. Chop and wash the coriander.
  2. Clean, chop and wash the green garlic (if using).
  3. Take a large mixing bowl in which you need to add the grated coconut, coriander leaves, garlic, cumin powder, coriander powder, turmeric powder, minced chillies, minced ginger and salt to taste.
  4. Mix this with a spoon or hands, whichever is easier. Set aside.
  5. Next, work on the vegetables. Top and tail the flat beans and split them open. If very long, you can snap them in two else leave them whole.
  6. Peel, cut and wash purple yam.
  7. Cut and wash potato.
  8. Cut and wash sweet potato.
  9. Peel, wash and cut bottle gourd.
  10. Wash and cut the aubergine.
  11. Mix the bicarbonate of soda and half of the coriander-coconut mix to the flat beans and set aside.
  12. Combine the remaining vegetables (purple yam, potato, sweet potato, green peas, bottle gourd and aubergine) and add the remaining coriander-coconut mix. Toss the vegetables around so that they are evenly coated with the masala.
  13. Take a large cooking pot which has a tight fitting lid.
  14. Place it on high heat and pour oil.
  15. Once the oil is hot, add the carom seeds. As soon as they start spluttering, add the asafoetida.
  16. Add the papdi and stir well.
  17. Next, add the remaining six vegetables and mix them with the papdi.
  18. Place the sliced muthiya on top of the vegetables.
  19. Pour two cups of water and cover the mouth of the pot with a foil so that steam doesn’t escape easily.
  20. Now cover with the tight fitting lid, lower heat and let the vegetables cook on very low heat for 2 hours. Do not open in between. The vegetables shouldn’t stick to the bottom as we have sealed the mouth of the pot plus added 2 cups of water plus the vegetables like bottle gourd and aubergine will release their own moisture.
  21. Once the vegetables start cooking, you will get the aroma.
  22. After 2 hours, take the cooking pot off the heat and let it sit for 15 minutes.
  23. Remove the lid and open the foil. Mix the muthiya with the vegetables and check for doneness.
  24. Serve hot.

Note:

  1. Cut the vegetables into large chunks so that they do not break or dissolve while cooking.
  2. If the vegetables are not fully cooked after two hours, put the foil and the lid back and cook for additional 15 to 20 minutes. If you feel the need to add more water at this stage, make sure that you add boiling water (not room temperature).

 

Couscous with Aubergine Stew

Couscous with Aubergine Stew

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Don’t you just find it frustrating when you start your day early (like 5.00 in my case this morning) and you are through with your morning ritual and at your desk by 6.00 am thinking smugly to yourself, “oh look at me, I am so good, I am going to start my work day early today” only to find that there is some problem with the internet connection. I know, I know – I should learn to live without the internet, the internet is not the be all and end all, that I should go get a life. But internet is critical for my work and so whenever it goes down, specially first thing in the morning when I get to my desk as happened today, I find it freakin’ frustrating!

Fortunately, there is nothing frustrating about cooking couscous. Each time I cook this easygoing grain, I wonder why I don’t do so more frequetly. It is hassle free in that you can prep it in a matter of minutes even after the sauce or the stew accompanying it is made.

if couscous was a musician and not a grain, it would probably warble I’m easy

Ass Kicking Chillies for Couscous with Aubergine stewFor today’s couscous recipe, I made an aubergine stew with peppers and onions enveloped in my totally kooky sauce. Having never cooked with tahini before (only used it for dressing or in hummus), I wanted to experiment with it during the actual cooking process. Match that with my recently discovered love for tomato ketchup and some hot chillies and you get one creamy yet fiery sauce which totally works with the meek and mild couscous. Toasted sunflower and pumpkin seeds provide the lovely – and much desired – nutty and crunchy texture to finish off the dish.

There are plenty of different varieties of aubergine out there. I used the long and slim purple ones. As for the chillies, my greengrocer has got some red chillies which he sold to me a couple of days back. They look harmless (I am told that the big, fat ones are usually mild compared to the skinny ones which are supposed to be wild) but these beauties know how to kick ass!

If you don’t have couscous, you can try the stew with plain rice.

Ingredients

1 Cup dry couscous

150 Grams aubergine

1 Green Pepper

2-3 Hot chillies (adjust quantity according to personal preference)

1 Tomato

2 Onions

1 Tablespoon tahini

1 Tablespoon tomato ketchup

A generous pinch of smoked paprika (optional)

1 Teaspoon sumac* (optional)

8-10 pitted black olives

1 Tablespoon mixture of sunflower and pumpkin seeds

1 Tablespoon dukka* (optional)

1 Tablespoon olive oil

Salt to taste

Method

  1. Peel, wash and finely chop the onion.
  2. Wash and slice the chillies.
  3. Wash and finely dice the tomato.
  4. Wash and finely chop the green pepper.
  5. Split the olives into two. If you have the unpitted variety, remove the stone.
  6. In a bowl, combine the tahini, tomato ketchup, black olives, paprika (if using) and sumac (if using). Add about half a cup of water and mix well. Set aside this sauce mix.
  7. Heat a frying pan and once it becomes hot, toast the sunflower and pumpkin seeds for a couple of minutes till they turn a light shade of brown. Be careful not to burn them.
  8. Once the seeds are nicely toasted, remove them to a plate.
  9. Return the frying pan to heat and pour the oil.
  10. Once the oil beomes hot, add the chopped onions, tomato, green pepper, chillies and salt to taste. Mix well, cover, lower the heat and let the vegetables cook for 10 minutes.
  11. While the onion mixture is cooking, wash and chop the aubergine.
  12. After 10 minutes, uncover and add the aubergine along with the sauce mix. Stir everything together, add some more water if you think it is needed, cover and let the stew cook for 10 minutes after which time take the pan off the heat.
  13. While the stew is resting, cook couscous according to instructions on the packet.
  14. Plate the cooked couscous with stew over it.
  15. Sprinkle with toasted sunflower and pumpkin seeds and dukka (if using).

Note:

  1. Dukka is a versatile Jordanian spice mixture made with roasted sesame, wheat and coriander. It can be used as a seasoning, as a marinade or even in dips.
  2. Instead of sumac, you can use a teaspoon of cider vinegar or red wine vinegar. I wouldn’t recomment lemon or lime juice for this recipe as it would become too sour. You want just a wee hint of tartness.

Panchkutiyu Shaak/Five Vegetables Cooked in Coriander, Coconut & Green Garlic

Panchkutiyu Shaak/Five Vegetables Cooked in Coriander and Coconut

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

traditional Gujarati delicacy of five types of vegetables cooked in a mixture of fresh coriander, coconut and fresh green garlic

My dad is very fond of purple yam (also known as kand, rataloo, violet yam), a vegetable currently in season.

After a two month stay in Hong Kong, he was stopping over before resuming his onward journey. I thought that he may like some home-cooked dinner after such an extended stay away from home so I asked him what I should cook. His first response was my signature spaghetti. But when he came to know that I had some purple yam in my larder, he changed his response to “anything with purple yam”!

So, I decided to make this panchkutiyu shaak using the yam and other seasonal vegetables.

my signature spaghetti patiently awaits its turn

For this recipe, green garlic is a must. It simply won’t taste the same with ordinary garlic. The quantity given may seem a lot but green garlic has a very delicate taste and  is not as pungent as its dry counterpart.

The following serves 4 people. Don’t worry if there is left-over; it tastes just as good for the next couple of days as long as you keep it refrigerated.

This is a complete meal and doesn’t really need any accompaniment.

Ingredients

400 Grams Purple Yam

8 – 10 Baby aubergine

250 Grams field beans (papdi)

2 Green bananas (raw)

250 Grams fresh green tuvar dal, also known as lilva dana or shelled peas

2 Packed cups freshly grated coconut

3 Packed cups fresh coriander (including stalk, if tender)

250 Grams green garlic

2 Tablespoons Coriander powder

2 Tablespoons Cumin powder

1 Tablespoon minced green chillies and ginger

1/4 Cup oil

1 Teaspoon asafoetida

Salt to taste

Method

  1. First prep the vegetables.
  2. Peel and chop into largish cubes the purple yam. Keep it in water.
  3. Peel, wash and chop the green bananas.
  4. Top, tail, de-string and snap into two the field beans.
  5. Cut each aubergine into four and leave in some water.
  6. Wash and chop the coriander leaves.
  7. Top and peel the garlic, chop and wash. Take the green parts along with the white.
  8. In a bowl, mix the grated coconut, fresh coriander, green garlic, coriander powder, cumin powder, chilli-ginger paste and salt.
  9. Remove the yam and aubergine from water and place in a wide bottom pan. Throw in the field beans, fresh tuvar dal or peas and green banana.
  10. To the vegetables, add the coconut-coriander-spices. Combine well ensuring that all the vegetables are coated with this mix.
  11. Now, take a large pot and add oil.
  12. Once the oil heats up, add the asafoetida.
  13. Stir for a few seconds and add the vegetables along with any coconut-coriander masala clinging to the the pan.
  14. Add about half a cup of water. Stir, cover, lower the heat and let the vegetables cook for about an hour.
  15. Serve hot.

goes very well with rotis or phulkas with a smidgen of ghee on them

Vegetables that I used for Panchkutiyu Shaak

Vegetables used for Panchkutiyu Shaak

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fresh Coriander, Coconut and Green Garlic Base for Panchkutiyu Shaak

Fresh Coriander, Coconut and Green Garlic Base for Panchkutiyu Shaak

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cooked Panchkutiyu Shaak

Cooked Panchkutiyu Shaak