Category Archives: Vegetables (Indian Style)

Baingan Bharta/Smoked Aubergine, The Indian Way

Baingan Bharta/Smoked Aubergine, The Indian Way

  • Servings: 1-2
  • Time: 40mins
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Baingan Bharta/Smoked Aubergine, The Indian Way

 

 

 

 

 

 

I think age is catching up on me because I often find myself checking my own blog to see whether I have posted a particular recipe! As was the case with today’s one and I cannot believe that having been blogging for nearly a year now, I have not written about one of my favourite Indian vegetable preparations.

baingan bharta is an ode to all aubergine lovers, or so I like to think

Smoked aubergine cooked with onions, tomato and garlic for a velvety, delicious vegetable which can be scooped with any type of bread or equally divine on some plain boiled rice – what is there not to like?!

Earlier, I used to smoke the aubergine directly on a gas burner as is. But I have recently discovered that if you oil it a bit, it truly imparts that smokey aroma and flavour. If you don’t have a gas burner, you can try it on a grill although I can’t vouch for the end result in terms of smokiness.

When choosing an aubergine for baingan bharta, go for one which doesn’t weigh too much (irrespective of size). The heavy ones have more seeds in them.

Ingredients

1 Medium size aubergine

2 Onion

1 Head of garlic

2 Tomato

2-3 Fresh green chilli

Fresh ginger the size of your thumb

1/2 Cup fresh coriander

1-2 Teaspoons cumin seeds

1 Teaspoon turmeric

1 Teaspoon chilli powder

1 Teaspoon garam masala

1 Tablespoon oil

Salt to taste

Method

  1. Wash the aubergine and apply a bit of oil all over.
  2. Place the aubergine on a gas burner and cook it till its skin is charred and the vegetable softens about 90% (you don’t want it completely collapsing). This does become slightly messy so be prepared to clean the burner afterwards!
  3. As soon as the aubergine is almost cooked on the open flame, transfer it to an airtight container. This way, it will cook in its own steam a bit more.
  4. In the meantime, peel, wash and dice the onion.
  5. Peel and chop the garlic.
  6. Wash and slice the green chilli.
  7. Peel, wash and grate the ginger.
  8. Wash, chop and dry the fresh coriander.
  9. Heat the oil in a frying pan.
  10. When the oil becomes hot, lower the heat and add the cumin seeds.
  11. As soon as they stop spluttering, throw in the onion, garlic, tomato, green chilli and ginger.
  12. Add turmeric powder, chilli powder and salt to taste. Mix well.
  13. Cover and cook for 10 minutes.
  14. While the onion mixture is cooking, go back to the aubergine.
  15. Remove the charred skin and roughly chop the flesh.
  16. Once the 10 minutes are up, uncover the pan and add the aubergine and garam masala powder. Mix well.
  17. Cover and cook for 5 minutes.
  18. Take off the heat and let it rest for 5 minutes.
  19. Add the fresh coriander before serving.

Kantola & Arbi

Kantola & Arbi

  • Servings: 2
  • Time: 60mins
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Kantola & Arbi

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

indulge me my current kantola fetish a bit more my dear kooky readers

Today’s recipe is another made-up one from my kooky repertoire.

I thought of marrying the two seasonal vegetables for a hearty and delicious dish which can be enjoyed hot or cold, with bread or rotis or even on its own.

Arbi, also known as taro root, is full of goodness so even if you are watching your weight, I would urge you not to dismiss it as ordinary carb.

In this recipe, the arbi is first boiled, peeled and sliced before it gets cooked with kantola. I cooked mine in a pressure cooker (three pressures on high). If you prefer, you can cook it in a pan of boiling water. Don’t worry too much about its sticky attribute; once cooked you don’t notice it.

Ingredients

250 Grams kantola

250 Grams arbi

1 + 1 Tablespoon coriander powder

1 + 1 Tablespoon cumin powder

1 + 1 Tablespoon turmeric powder

1 + 1 Tablespoon chilli powder

1 Tablespoon fennel seeds

1-2 Tablespoons sesame seeds

1 Tablespoon cumin seeds

1 Tablespoon mustard seeds

1 Tablespoon oil

Salt to taste

Method

  1. Boil the arbi and once it cools down, peel and slice in rounds of medium thickness.
  2. In one bowl, add 1 tablespoon each of coriander, cumin, chilli and turmeric powder.
  3. Add this powder mix to the boiled, sliced arbi along with a pinch of salt.
  4. Toss so that the powders coat all arbi slices. Cover and set aside.
  5. Wash, dry and remove the top end of kantola.
  6. Cut the vegetable along its length and slice it.
  7. Heat the oil in a wok like pan.
  8. When the oil heats up, add the mustard seeds.
  9. Once they start spluttering, add the cumin, fennel and sesame seeds.
  10. Lower the flame and stir around for 30 seconds.
  11. Next, add the sliced kantola and the remaining powdered spices (1 tablespoon each of coriander, cumin, chilli and turmeric).
  12. Add salt to taste.
  13. Mix well, cover and cook for 20-25 minutes.
  14. Uncover and check for doneness.
  15. Add the sliced arbi coated in spice powders, mix well with the kantola, cover and cook for about 7 to 8 minutes.
  16. Take off the flame and let the cooked vegetables rest for 5 minutes before serving.

White Velvet Okra, The Indian Way

White Velvet Okra, The Indian Way

  • Servings: 1-2
  • Time: 30mins
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

White Velvet Okra, The Indian Way

 

 

 

 

 

I have just returned from a short break in Goa, a veritable food lovers’ paradise.

Memorable dinners include prawn curry (one of THE best I’ve ever had), red snapper stuffed with Goan masala, chicken biriyani and a kind of mutton stew. All to be enjoyed with some very moreish cashew feni!

Walked around Mapusa market which has the most amazing varieties of fresh produce, foods and other stuff. Unfortunately, I had left my camera in the room so couldn’t take photos and I was kicking myself throughout the visit to the market.

White Velvet Okragoa produces a lot of fruits and vegetables which are special to that region

One of those is white okra (safed bhindi). This variety of okra is very pale green in colour, slightly thicker in circumference and easily 10″-12″ long. Given its size, the vegetable is sold in units instead of by weight. The cooked okra is quite buttery in terms of texture.

I looked up white okra on the internet but there isn’t much information on this vegetable in cyberspace. According to this website, the vegetable (also known as white velvet okra) used to be grown in the Southern United States.

I did try Goan style okra while there and the taste is interesting because they add wet kokum to it (a first for me). But the following recipe is for regular Indian style okra adapted to white okra.

Will go well with any type of bread.

In the photograph above, in the salad on the left you might have noticed some cut lemons. They are also local to Goa. Slightly bigger than a golf ball, they have orange flesh and are unbelievably juicy.

Plenty of Goan trips are on the cards in the coming months so will be sharing more about Goan food culture as and when :-).

Ingredients

12 White Okra (or 500 grams regular okra)

1 Tablespoon coriander powder

1 Tablespoon cumin powder

1-2 Teaspoons turmeric powder

1-2 Teaspoons chilli powder

1 Tablespoon fenugreek seeds

1-2 Teaspoons asafoetida

1 Tablespoon oil

Salt to taste

Method

  1. Wipe the okra with a damp cloth.
  2. Remove the head and slice them into bite size pieces.
  3. In a bowl, mix the dry powders: coriander, cumin, turmeric and chilli.
  4. Heat the oil in a wok like pan.
  5. Once it is hot, add the fenugreek seeds followed by the asafoetida.
  6. Lower the heat and stir for about 30 seconds.
  7. Add the sliced okra, dry powders and salt to taste.
  8. Mix well, cover and cook for 20 minutes.
  9. Take off the flame and let the cooked vegetable rest for about 5 minutes before serving.

Kantola Per Eedu, The Parsi Way/Kantola with Eggs, The Parsi Way

Kantola with Eggs, The Parsi Way

  • Servings: 2
  • Time: 40mins
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Kantola with Eggs, The Parsi Way

 

 

 

 

 

it’s raining kantola in my kooky kitchen at the moment

Following on from my mum’s recipe for this short-seasoned vegetable, today I am sharing with you an absolutely delicious version which I got from my friend Meher.

A couple of months back, Meher had taken me to see her mum who was just back home following a hospital stay. Mum’s lunch menu was Parsi style karela per eedu (bitter gourd with eggs). I was intrigued by this dish and guess it must have been hibernating at the back of my mind because when I was thinking of a different variation for kantola, I immediately thought of Meher’s mum’s lunch.

I got in touch with Meher who shared the following recipe with me.

Parsis love their eggs and they are happy to cook it on almost anything. Meher’s husband Percy told me that he even enjoys breaking a couple of eggs on potato straws (wafers/chips)!

If you like eggs and if you like kantola, I would highly recommend today’s recipe. The combination totally works.

If you intend to try this in your kitchen, don’t skip the fresh coriander because it freshly enhances the taste of the final dish. Also, according o Meher, the end result has to look green so use fresh green chilli instead of chilli powder.

Enjoy with any type of bread.

Another recipe for keeps.

Ingredients

500 Grams kantola

2 Eggs

1 Large onion

2 Tomato

10-15 Fresh curry leaves

Small bunch fresh coriander

2-3 Green chilli or 1 – 2 teaspoons paste of ginger and green chilli

1 Teaspoon turmeric powder

1 Tablespoon coriander powder

1 Tablespoon cumin powder

1 Teaspoon whole cumin

1 Tablespoon oil

Salt to taste

Method

  1. Wash and dry the kantola. You can either leave them in a colander for the water to drain or dry them on a kitchen towel.
  2. Top and tail the vegetable and slice it along its length.
  3. Peel, wash and slice the onion.
  4. Wash and slice the tomato.
  5. Wash and finely chop the green chilli, if using.
  6. Chop, wash and dry the coriander. Use its stalk if tender.
  7. Heat the oil in a frying pan.
  8. When hot, lower the heat and add the cumin seeds followed by the curry leaves.
  9. Next, add the onion and salt to taste.
  10. Stir, cover and cook for 5 minutes.
  11. Uncover and add the tomato.
  12. Again, cover and cook for 3 to 4 minutes.
  13. Uncover and add the kantola, turmeric powder, coriander powder, cumin powder and either chopped chilli or paste of chilli and ginger.
  14. Add more salt if necessary.
  15. Mix thoroughly, cover and cook for 20 minutes.
  16. Once the time is up, take the lid off and check for doneness.
  17. If you feel that the kantola is cooked, add the chopped coriander and mix well.
  18. Now, break the eggs over the vegetables, cover and cook for 5 minutes.
  19. Take the pan off the heat and let it sit for 5 more minutes so that the eggs cook some more in the steam.
  20. Enjoy hot.

Kantola/Spiny Gourd/Teasle Gourd

Kantola/Spiny Gourd/Teasle Gourd

  • Servings: 1-2
  • Time: 45mins
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Kantola Nu Shaak

 

 

 

 

 

Kantola is a small, oval-shaped vegetable very similar to karela (bitter gourd).  Spiky on the outside and seedy on the inside,  it is considered a delicacy in certain parts of India where it is available only during the monsoon season.

In the UK and other parts of the world where Indian grocery shops abound, this vegetable can be found in the frozen aisle.

a real (albeit, rare) treat

Kantola is very low in calories (17 calories per 100 grams) and has numerous health benefits including dietary fibre, antioxidants, minerals and vitamins.

KantolaThe way my mum makes kantola is super yummy; the following is recreated from my memory and it is very close to how she makes it.

Enjoy with some roti and salad for a simple and delicious meal.

Ingredients

500 Grams kantola

1-2 Tablespoons coriander powder

1-2 Teaspoons cumin powder

1-2 Teaspoons chilli powder

1-2 Teaspoons Turmeric powder

1 Teaspoon asafoetida

1-2 Tablespoons oil

Salt to taste

Method

  1. Wash the kantola and either leave them in a colander for about half hour or dry them on a kitchen towel.
  2. Top, tail and halve them and finely slice them along their length.
  3. In a small bowl, mix the salt, coriander, cumin, chilli and turmeric powders.
  4. Heat the oil in a pan with tight fitting lid.
  5. Once the oil is hot, reduce heat and add the asafoetida followed by the spice powders.
  6. Stir for about 10 to 15 seconds and add the sliced kantola.
  7. Mix well so that the kantola is thoroughly coated with the spice mix.
  8. Cover and cook for about 25 minutes.
  9. Uncover and check for doneness. Also check for taste and add more of the coriander and/or cumin powder if you feel the need.
  10. Cover and cook for further 5-7 minutes.
  11. Take the pan off the stove and let the cooked vegetable be for a few minutes before serving.

Karela & Rataloo, The Kooky Way/Bitter Gourd & Sweet Potato, The Kooky Way

Karela & Sweet Potato

  • Servings: 1-2
  • Time: 40mins
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Bitter Gourd & Sweet Potato

 

 

 

 

 

I restrict my potato intake to once a week and try to substitute the tuber with sweet potato wherever I know that it won’t distract from the end result.

In today’s fuss-free recipe, the bitterness of karela (bitter gourd) is offset by the slight sugariness of sweet potato (also known as rataloo in some parts of India).

a twist on the more familiar karela and aloo (potato) which is cooked in different avatars across the Indian subcontinent

Many people sprinkle salt over over karela and squeeze out the bitter juices before cooking. Personally, I skip this step but you can do so if you wish. Bear in mind that the sweet potato naturally reduces any obvious bitterness of karela.

Bitter gourd is commonly available in Asian grocery stores so if you have ever wondered how to cook the vegetable, give this kooky creation a go.

Goes well with roti, naan, tortilla or even sliced bread.

Ingredients

250 Grams karela

1 Medium size sweet potato

1-2 Heads of garlic

1 Teaspoon turmeric powder

1-2 Teaspoons chilli powder

1 Tablespoon coriander powder

1-2 Teaspoon cumin powder

1 Teaspoon amchoor powder (dry mango)

1 Teaspoon asafoetida

1 Tablespoon oil

Salt to taste

Method

  1. Peel and slice the garlic across its length.
  2. Wash and finely slice the karela in shape of matchsticks.
  3. Wash and slice the sweet potato same shape as karela.
  4. Sprinkle some salt all over the sliced sweet potato and set aside
  5. In a bowl, mix the powders: turmeric, chilli, coriander, cumin and amchoor.
  6. Heat the oil in a frying pan.
  7. Once hot, reduce the heat and add the asafoetida.
  8. After about 10 seconds, throw in the sliced garlic.
  9. Stir around for a couple of minutes till the garlic is about to change colour. You don’t want it brown.
  10. Add the powdered spices and mix well. Cook for a minute or so.
  11. Next, add the karela and a bit of salt to taste. Remember that you have already sprinkled some salt on sweet potato.
  12. Mix, cover and cook for about 10 minutes.
  13. After the time is up, uncover and add the sweet potato.
  14. Once again, mix well, cover and let this cook for 20 minutes.
  15. Take off the stove and let the vegetable sit for 5 minutes before having.

Simple Tendli (Ivy Gourd), The Kooky Mum’s Way

Simple Tendli/Tindora/Ivy Gourd, The Kooky Mum's Way

  • Servings: 1-2
  • Time: 40mins
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Simple Tendli, The Kooky Mum's Way

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You know how there are some foods which you’ve had over the years and which have seen you from childhood into tantrum-filled teenagehood into a (hopefully!) mature adulthood and while you have changed their taste remains unchanged? This is one such recipe.

Tendli, also known as tindora, ivy gourd, baby watermelon, little gourd and gentleman’s toe (!) was a firm favourite in our family. The amazing thing was that each time my mum cooked it, it tasted exactly the same (as is the case even now).

I tried replicating her recipe from my imagination and the end result was a twin – taste: copy; texture: copy; aroma: copy. How bizarre is that?!

Interestingly, cooking with tendli is not confined to the Indian subcontinent.

According to Wikipedia, its consumption “extends from Africa to Asia, including India, the Philippines, China, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, Vietnam, eastern Papua New Guinea, and the Northern Territories, Australia. Its documented introduced range includes the Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Guam, Saipan, Hawaii, the Marshall Islands, Samoa, Tonga, and Vanuatu.” I find this very fascinating and would love to experiment with this vegetable in some non-Indian dish.

a really simple, straightforward, fuss-free recipe which can be made with basic store cupboard ingredients

It goes very well with rotis. I had some salad on the side as you can see from the photo. A delicious, nostalgic dinner.

Ingredients

250 Grams tendli

2 Medium size potato

1 Teaspoon turmeric powder

1-2 Teaspoons chilli powder

1 Tablespoon coriander powder

1 Tablespoon cumin powder

1 Teaspoon asafoetida

1-2 Teaspoons oil

Salt to taste

Method

  1. Wash the tendli and either dry it on a kitchen towel or leave it in a colander to get rid of the excess water.
  2. Once the tendli is dry, halve it along its length and slice it finely.
  3. Wash and slice the potato in the same way (halve along its length and slice finely) or in medium size cubes.
  4. Heat the oil in a frying pan.
  5. Once it is hot, reduce the heat to minimum and add the asafoetida and turmeric.
  6. Next, add the sliced tendli and salt to taste.
  7. Mix well, cover and cook for 10 minutes.
  8. Uncover, add the potato, chilli powder, cumin powder and coriander powder.
  9. Once again, mix thoroughly, cover and cook for 10 to 15 minutes.
  10. By the end of this cooking time, both the vegetables should have cooked. If no, cover and cook for a few more minutes.
  11. Serve with roti. also goes very well with dal and rice.

Tinda (Apple Gourd) & Yellow Courgette, The Indian Way

Curry of Apple Gourd & Yellow Courgette

  • Servings: 1-2
  • Time: 60mins
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Tinda & Yellow Courgette, The Indian Way

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tinda is a summer vegetable and one reason I love it is because it is so light and easy on the stomach.

Its numerous health benefits include anti-inflammatory agents which control or prevent heart disease, blood pressure and cancer (prostate in particular); fiber content which aids digestion and carotene which slows down the ageing process.

In this recipe, I have tried to balance colours – green tinda, yellow courgette, red tomato and white onion.

one dish which instantly and deliciously provides you with 4 of your 5-a-day

This will go very well with any type of bread like roti, naan, or even plain sliced. I had mine with some ragi roti. You can also enjoy it with rice.

The following is my own kooky recipe, not a heritage one or family or grandma or any other associations!

Ingredients

4 Tinda

1 Yellow Courgette

2 Onions

2 Tomato

1 Tablespoon paste of ginger and garlic

6-8 Baris* (sun dried lentil dumplings)

1 Teaspoon cumin seeds

1 Teaspoon mustard seeds

1 Tablespoon fennel seeds

1 Teaspoon cumin powder

1 Tablespoon coriander powder

1 Teaspoon turmeric powder

1-2 Teaspoons chilli powder

2-3 Dry red chillies, broken

1 Teaspoon garam masala powder

1/2 Cup yoghurt (tart/sour/strong)

1 Tablespoon oil

Salt to taste

Method

  1. Peel, wash and finely chop the onion.
  2. Wash and dice the tomato.
  3. Wash and chop the tinda in bite size pieces.
  4. Wash and chop the courgette same size as tinda.
  5. Dry roast the baris.
  6. In a small bowl, mix the cumin powder, coriander powder, chilli powder and turmeric powder. Add 1 tablespoon of water to make a paste. Set aside.
  7. Heat the oil in a wok like pan.
  8. When it is hot, lower the heat and add the mustard seeds.
  9. Once they start crackling, add the cumin seeds followed by fennel seeds and broken dried red chilli.
  10. Stir around for 30 seconds.
  11. Next, add the chopped onion and salt to taste.
  12. Mix well, cover and cook for 5 to 7 minutes.
  13. Uncover and throw in the ginger-garlic paste.
  14. Cook – uncovered – for about 3 to 4 minutes.
  15. Add the chopped tomato and paste of coriander, cumin, turmeric and chilli powders.
  16. Stir, cover and cook for 5 minutes.
  17. Whisk the yoghurt and add to the pan.
  18. Cook – uncovered – for 3 to 4 minutes.
  19. Add the chopped tinda and courgette.
  20. Mix everything together, add about half cup of water, baris and garama masala powder.
  21. Cover and cook for about 10 to 15 minutes till the vegetables are tender.
  22. Take the pan off the heat and let it sit for about 5 minutes before serving.

Note:

  1. If your baris are the size of popcorn, 6 to 8 is enough. If they are larger, take 2 to 3 and break them into small pieces before dry roasting.
  2. Make sure that the yoghurt is tangy; this won’t taste as well with mild yoghurt.

Colocasia with Green Pea & Corn, The Indian Way

Arbi Makai Matar

  • Servings: 1-2
  • Time: 1hour
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Arbi Makai Matar

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The other day, I was chatting to my friend Meher who told me that she had had one of the yummiest colocasia preparations for lunch, courtesy one of her work colleagues. She didn’t know the recipe except that the tuber was first fried in order to get rid of the stickiness.

This got me thinking about how I have not had colocasia in absolutely ages, probably years.

colocasia is also known as arbi, elephant-ear, taro and dasheen

Since it is a starchy root vegetable, the kooky side in me decided to look up its nutritional information in order to decide whether to cook with it or not.

Was pleasantly surprised to discover that although high in calorie (100 grams has 112 calories, more than potato), the root is very low in fat and protein and “is one of the finest source of dietary fibers“.  It also contains minerals, potassium and vitamins from the B-complex group.

Since the calorie count is high, I decided to team it with a couple of other vegetables to make a balanced meal. I don’t mind the fact that it is sticky so I boiled the root  before adding it to the curry. An alternative would be to saute the boiled slices to get a crust before slipping them in the sauce.

I made up the recipe as I went along and, if I am allowed to boast a little, this is one of my kooky triumphs. You know how sometimes you cook something and its like, “meh”. And other times you make something which turns out so stupendous that you want to share it with everyone and shout from the roof-top… Okay, you get the picture! Oh, and it smells totally divine.

Will go very well with any type of flat bread like roti, naan or even sliced. Can also be eaten with rice.

Ingredients

100 Grams colocasia

50 Grams green pea

50 Grams sweetcorn kernel

2 Tomato

2 Onions

1 Tablespoon paste of ginger and garlic

1 Cup plain yoghurt (sharp/tangy/sour)

1 Teaspoon turmeric powder

1 Teaspoon chilli powder

1 Teaspoon coriander powder

1 Teaspoon cumin powder

1 Tablespoon fennel seeds

3 Dry red chillies

A pinch of asafoetida

Salt to taste

1-2 Teaspoons oil

Method

  1. First, boil the colocasia till it is firm but tender. You can either do this in a pressure cooker or in boiling water.
  2. Once the colocasia is cooked, let it cool down.
  3. Wash, peel and slice it in thick rounds.
  4. Peel, wash and finely chop the onion.
  5. Wash and dice the tomato.
  6. Wash the green pea and sweetcorn kernels.
  7. Whisk the yoghurt and add the turmeric, chilli, coriander and cumin powders to it. Mix well and set aside.
  8. Break the dry chillies into 2-3 pieces each.
  9. Heat the oil in a pan.
  10. Once hot, lower the heat and add fennel seeds, dry chillies and asafoetida.
  11. Stir for about 30 seconds.
  12. Add the chopped onion and salt to taste. Mix, cover and let the onion cook for 5 minutes.
  13. Uncover and add the paste of ginger and garlic.
  14. Stir well and let this cook for 2 to 3 minutes.
  15. Next, add the chopped tomato. Cover and cook for 3 to 4 minutes.
  16. Uncover and add the spiced yoghurt.
  17. Stir everything together and cook for 3 to 4 minutes.
  18. Add about 2 cups of water, increase the heat and bring to boil.
  19. Once the sauce starts boiling, lower the heat and add the sliced colocasia, green pea and sweetcorn kernel.
  20. Cover and cook for about 20 minutes.
  21. Take the pan off the burner and let it sit for 5 minutes before serving.

Purple Yam, Aubergine & Green Pea Curry

Purple Yam, Aubergine & Green Pea Curry

  • Servings: 2
  • Time: 45mins
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Purple Yam, Aubergine & Green Pea Curry

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As summer peaks its head from around the corner, it is time to say au revoir to green garlic, fresh turmeric and purple yam.

here is a quick, simple and delicious vegetable curry which is easily adaptable to what’s available or in your kitchen

I made it in under an hour while enjoying The Soul Of Motown. I love Gladys Knight & The Pips’ version of I Heard It Through The Grapevine, what do you think (in at 17:09)?

But I digress…

Coming back to today’s recipe, you can use white or sweet potato instead of yam. Substitute green peas with any other type of fresh beans or even dried beans. As for the aubergine, I used the small black variety but, again, you can use the type which is fresh and/or in season.

Will go well with roti, bread roll or even tortilla.

Ingredients

150 Grams purple yam

150 Grams aubergine

1 Cup Green peas

3-4 cloves Garlic

1 Cup fresh coriander

1 Tablespoon grated coconut (dessicated will also do)

1 Teaspoon carom seeds (ajwain)

1 Teaspoon asafoetida

1 Teaspoon turmeric powder

1 Tablespoon cumin powder

1 Tablespoon coriander powder

1 Tablespoon minced green chillies

1 Tablespoon grated ginger

Salt to taste

1 Tablespoon oil

Method

  1. Peel, wash and cube the purple yam into medium sized pieces.
  2. Wash the green peas.
  3. Wash and cube the aubergine and leave it in water to prevent it from turning black.
  4. Chop and wash the coriander leaves.
  5. Peel the garlic and lightly smash the cloves with the knife.
  6. Heat oil in a wok-like pan.
  7. Once it is hot, lower the heat to minimum and add the carom seeds followed by the asafoetida. Stir for 30 seconds.
  8. Add the smashed garlic cloves and beat them with the back of the spoon (they will break easily).
  9. Stir for a minute.
  10. Add the purple yam, aubergine, green peas along with half cup of water.
  11. Toss in the turmeric, ground coriander, ground cumin, chilli, ginger, coconut, coriander and salt to taste.
  12. Mix well, cover and cook for about 20 minutes.
  13. After 20 minutes, uncover to check whether the vegetables are cooked. If so, take off the stove. If not, cover and cook for 5 t o10 more minutes.
  14. Enjoy hot.