Category Archives: Main Course Vegetables

Kooky Mess

Kooky Mess

  • Servings: 1
  • Difficulty: easy
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Kooky Mess

 

 

 

 

 

 

At times, there are recipes that I concoct which defy categorisation or even label and this is a very good example.

The day I was making it, I was asked by three people what I was having for dinner and I was at a total loss for words. I mean, how do you explain a bowl of mixed mash, which briefly sums up this kooky mess?!

To quote Francois Mauriac, “To love someone is to see a miracle invisible to others.” And that is exactly how I feel about today’s recipe.

a bowl of mashed vegetables may not be to everyone’s taste but I am totally in love with this utterly comforting mess!

Ingredients

1 Medium sweet potato

1 Cup shredded cabbage

1 Large carrot

1 Large onion

1-2 Tablespoons cheddar cheese, crumbled

1 Teaspoons olive oil

Freshly ground pepper to taste

Salt to taste

Method

  1. Wash, boil, peel and mash the sweet potato.
  2. Wash, scrape and finely grate the carrot.
  3. Peel, wash and finely slice the onion.
  4. Heat the oil in a frying pan.
  5. When hot, lower the heat and throw in the sliced onions along with salt to taste.
  6. Mix well, cover and cook for 5 minutes.
  7. Uncover and add the shredded cabbage and grated carrot.
  8. Once again, cover and cook for 7 to 8 minutes.
  9. Uncover and add the mashed sweet potato, freshly ground black pepper and cheese.
  10. Mix well and pat the mixture down.
  11. Cover and cook for 10 minutes.
  12. Serve hot or warm with some hot sauce.

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Fruity Mixed Bean & Vegetable Salad, The Kooky Way

Mixed Bean & Vegetable Salad

  • Servings: 1-2
  • Difficulty: easy
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Mixed Bean & Vegetable Salad, The Kooky Way

 

 

 

 

 

Having just returned from a very indulgent break 🙂 and half a kilo weight gain :-(, I fancied something low fat, healthy yet satisfying for my dinner.

Since I had ingredients for salad lying around, I decided to build on what was on hand and the result is this main meal salad recipe.

something raw, something cooked, something steamed, something char-grilled, something sweet, something smokey, something spicy, something tangy, something salty all on one plate: sounds like a Britart exhibit doesn’t it?!

The recipe calls for plenty of garlic and mint, garlic to aid digestion of otherwise gassy beans and mint to balance out the pungent garlic taste. So if you are a fan of these two ingredients, definitely worth giving this a go.

Ingredients

1 Cup cooked mixed beans

1 Medium size carrot

2 Green peppers

2 Onions

12-15 Cherry tomato

1 Asian pear

1 Cucumber

1/2 Cup fresh mint leaves

1 Large head of garlic

1-2 Tablespoons olive oil

1 Tablespoon cider vinegar

Juice of 2 lime or lemon

1 Teaspoon honey

1 Tablespoon dried, smoked, jalapeno flakes

Salt to taste

Method

  1. Wash and scrape the carrot. Remove the top, cut into thick batons and put in a steamer. Once the steam starts coming out, set the timer for 6 minutes. Take off the heat once steamed. Put the batons on a plate to cool down.
  2. Wash and grill the peppers either directly on a gas burner or in an oven (in which case drizzle a bit of olive oil).
  3. Once the peppers have cooled down, remove the skin, core and seeds and cut them in strips. Set aside.
  4. Peel, wash and finely slice the onion in half moon shape. Separate the rings.
  5. Wash and wipe the cherry tomato. Slit them with a knife leaving the base intact so that the salad dressing penetrates.
  6. Wash and halve the Asian pear. Remove the core and slice it.
  7. Wash and halve the cucumber and slice it.
  8. Wash and dry the mint leaves.
  9. Take a large salad bowl and throw in the cooked beans, steamed carrot batons, sliced char-grilled peppers, cherry tomato, onion, Asian pear, cucumber and mint.
  10. Now make the dressing. Peel and grate the garlic.
  11. Whisk together the olive oil, cider vinegar, juice of lime or lemon, garlic, honey, jalapeno flakes and salt to taste.
  12. Check the dressing for taste and add whatever you feel is lacking.
  13. Pour the dressing over the salad, toss well and serve.

Tuna Laced Cauliflower Salad

Tuna Laced Cauliflower Salad

  • Servings: 1-2
  • Difficulty: easy
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Tuna Laced Cauliflower Salad

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cauliflower is one of those ubiquitous vegetables available all year round and yet I don’t eat enough of it.

Fish is another food I don’t eat as much as I should, specially the oily variety.

I had some tinned tuna lying around in my kitchen cupboard and I was wondering how to pair it up with cauliflower for a main course meal; this is the result.

If you want to try this salad and don’t have canned tuna, adopt my “anything goes” philosophy and use whichever fish you have. Prawns or crab would work just as well. If you are a vegetarian, skip the fish and throw in some cooked lentils instead.

A very lemony, garlicky dressing infuses the right amount of zing to this healthy and satisfying one pot meal.

an ideal mid-week supper dish

Can be enjoyed warm or at room temperature. Make it ahead of time and let the salad dressing flavours get infused into the vegetables for a truly delectable experience.

Ingredients for Salad

1 Small head cauliflower

100 Grams French beans

1 Medium carrot

10-12 Cherry tomato

1 Yellow Pepper

Small bunch spring onion

10-12 Fresh basil leaves

1 Small can tuna (drained weight 110 grams)

10-12 Black olives

Ingredients for Dressing

1 Large head garlic

1 Tablespoon mustard powder

1 Tablespoon cider vinegar

1-2 Tablespoons olive oil

Juice of 2 limes or lemons

1 Teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1-2 Teaspoons jaggery powder (or honey)

Salt to taste

 

Method

  1. First, we need to prep the vegetables for salad. Remove tough stalks off the cauliflower. Retain tender leaves and stems. Break florets into medium size pieces with your hands. Roughly chop the heart if tender. Wash, drain and set aside.
  2. Scrape and wash the carrot. Slice into thick batons.
  3. Top and tail the french beans. Snap into half if very long else leave them whole. Wash, drain and set aside.
  4. Wash and halve the cherry tomato.
  5. Wash, de-core, de-seed and slice the yellow pepper.
  6. Wash and slice the spring onion (white part only).
  7. Pit the olives if they have stone in them.
  8. Drain the tuna.
  9. Wash and pat dry the basil and cauliflower leaves.
  10. Steam the cauliflower, carrot and french beans till just cooked. You want them to retain a bite. Use a timer. Once the steam water comes to boil, time for exactly 5 minutes and take off the heat. That should be sufficient.
  11. Cool the steamed cauliflower, carrot and french beans.
  12. Toss all the salad ingredients in a large bowl and set aside.
  13. Next, we make the dressing. Peel and grate the garlic.
  14. Juice the lime/lemon.
  15. Whisk together the garlic, cider vinegar, olive oil, lime/lemon juice, mustard powder, jaggery powder, freshly ground black pepper and salt to taste.
  16. Pour the dressing over the salad, mix well, cover tightly and let the flavours infuse.

Note:

  1. This is the first time I tried powdered jaggery in salad dressing and the result was a hint of smokey sweetness (I used organic jaggery). You can substitute jaggery with honey or a pinch of brown sugar.

Sweet Potato Wedges, The Stove Top Way

Sweet Potato Wedges, The Stove Top Way

  • Servings: 1
  • Difficulty: easy
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Sweet Potato Wedges, The Stove Top Way

 

 

 

 

 

Say hello to one of my most successful, dead simple and guilt-free indulgences which never fails to impress, can be enjoyed as a one pot meal if you are looking for comfort food or can be served to a crowd along with drinks and other snacks.

Sweet potato is a nutrition dense vegetable rich in complex carbohydrates with high fibre content and a whole host of other health benefits.

This recipe is nothing more than sweet potato, a bit of olive oil and seasoning of your choice, all cooked on a stove for a yummy potato wedge experience.

crispy on the outside and meltingly soft inside

A note on the seasoning. In the photograph above, I have used Schwartz Garlic Pepper. Variations I have tried in the past include freshly grounded black peppercorns and paprika. Both work equally well. You can even skip the seasoning if you fancy plain salted.

Ingredients

250 Grams sweet potato

1 Tablespoon olive oil

1-2 Teaspoons seasoning of your choice

Salt to taste

Method

  1. Wash and cut the sweet potato into wedges. Make sure that they are all the same size so that they cook evenly. I prefer mine with the skin on but you can peel them if you wish.
  2. Combine the wedges with olive oil, seasoning and salt to taste. You can do this ahead of time if you prefer.
  3. Heat a frying pan on the highest temperature.
  4. Once the pan is hot, add the wedges along with all of the marinade (oil, salt and seasoning).
  5. Stir around for about 2 to 3 minutes.
  6. Next, lower the heat to minimum, cover and cook the sweet potato for about 10 to 15 minutes.
  7. Uncover and check for doneness.
  8. Cook the wedges for 10 more minutes without the lid.
  9. Enjoy hot or at room temperature with some ketchup or hot sauce.

Simple Tendli (Ivy Gourd), The Kooky Mum’s Way

Simple Tendli/Tindora/Ivy Gourd, The Kooky Mum's Way

  • Servings: 1-2
  • Difficulty: easy
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Simple Tendli, The Kooky Mum's Way

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You know how there are some foods which you’ve had over the years and which have seen you from childhood into tantrum-filled teenagehood into a (hopefully!) mature adulthood and while you have changed their taste remains unchanged? This is one such recipe.

Tendli, also known as tindora, ivy gourd, baby watermelon, little gourd and gentleman’s toe (!) was a firm favourite in our family. The amazing thing was that each time my mum cooked it, it tasted exactly the same (as is the case even now).

I tried replicating her recipe from my imagination and the end result was a twin – taste: copy; texture: copy; aroma: copy. How bizarre is that?!

Interestingly, cooking with tendli is not confined to the Indian subcontinent.

According to Wikipedia, its consumption “extends from Africa to Asia, including India, the Philippines, China, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, Vietnam, eastern Papua New Guinea, and the Northern Territories, Australia. Its documented introduced range includes the Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Guam, Saipan, Hawaii, the Marshall Islands, Samoa, Tonga, and Vanuatu.” I find this very fascinating and would love to experiment with this vegetable in some non-Indian dish.

a really simple, straightforward, fuss-free recipe which can be made with basic store cupboard ingredients

It goes very well with rotis. I had some salad on the side as you can see from the photo. A delicious, nostalgic dinner.

Ingredients

250 Grams tendli

2 Medium size potato

1 Teaspoon turmeric powder

1-2 Teaspoons chilli powder

1 Tablespoon coriander powder

1 Tablespoon cumin powder

1 Teaspoon asafoetida

1-2 Teaspoons oil

Salt to taste

Method

  1. Wash the tendli and either dry it on a kitchen towel or leave it in a colander to get rid of the excess water.
  2. Once the tendli is dry, halve it along its length and slice it finely.
  3. Wash and slice the potato in the same way (halve along its length and slice finely) or in medium size cubes.
  4. Heat the oil in a frying pan.
  5. Once it is hot, reduce the heat to minimum and add the asafoetida and turmeric.
  6. Next, add the sliced tendli and salt to taste.
  7. Mix well, cover and cook for 10 minutes.
  8. Uncover, add the potato, chilli powder, cumin powder and coriander powder.
  9. Once again, mix thoroughly, cover and cook for 10 to 15 minutes.
  10. By the end of this cooking time, both the vegetables should have cooked. If no, cover and cook for a few more minutes.
  11. Serve with roti. also goes very well with dal and rice.

Sprout, Pumpkin & Quinoa Souffléd Stuffed Pepper

Sprout, Pumpkin & Quinoa Souffléd Stuffed Pepper

  • Servings: 2
  • Difficulty: easy
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Sprout, Pumpkin & Quinoa Souffled Stuffed Pepper

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I am so very excited to share this recipe with you.

a delectable and delicious way of enjoying stuffed pepper

My relationship with sprouted grains and legumes is very haphazard and filled with uncertainty. I work backwards as in sprout first and than wonder how to make use instead of planning a recipe and sprouting according to requirement.

This time round, I had a batch of beautifully sprouted green desi chana (small green chickpea) with long white tail. Since I haven’t had quinoa for a while, I thought of combining the two but realised that there would be too much protein and so came up with the idea of stuffing some peppers with both along with pumpkin for balance.

Sprout, Pumpkin & Quinoa Souffled PepperThese are one of the best stuffed peppers I have eaten. Sorry if this sounds far from humble but they are just so utterly piquant and heavenly and also totally satisfying.

Since there was some stuffing leftover, I used it to fill a couple of  tomatoes. Works beautifully. Which makes me think that the stuffing would work well in courgette and aubergine as well.

I served some quickly stir-fried mushroom and broccoli on the side. Once the peppers are cooked, remove them to a plate. Add a couple of spoonfuls of Worcestershire sauce to glaze the pan, throw in the vegetable of your choice with a pinch of salt, give it a stir, cover and cook on low heat for about 5 to 7 minutes. You will have perfect accompaniment to the stuffed peppers.

Ingredients

1/2 Cup uncooked quinoa

1 Cup sprouted beans of your choice

2 Large pepper

2 Onion

2 Tomato

1 Head of garlic

5-6 Bird’s eye chilli

250 Grams pumpkin

1 Stock cube (chicken or vegetable)

2 Tablespoons crumbled feta cheese

8-10 Walnut halves

2 Tablespoons sunflower seeds

1-2 Eggs

1 Tablespoon olive oil

Salt to taste

 Method

  1. Peel, wash and finely chop the onion.
  2. Wash and finely dice the tomato.
  3. Peel and finely slice the garlic.
  4. Wash and finely mince the chilli.
  5. Wash, peel and finely grate the pumpkin.
  6. Dry roast the sunflower seeds and walnuts till they turn a couple of shades darker. Set aside to cool.
  7. Heat the oil in a large frying pan.
  8. Once it is hot, lower the heat and throw in the onion, garlic and chilli.
  9. Add salt to taste, mix well, cover and cook for 5 minutes.
  10. Next, add the tomato and cook (again, covered) for 3 to 4 minutes.
  11. Uncover and add the sprouted beans and quinoa.
  12. Add 1.5 cups of water along with the stock cube, stir thoroughly, cover and simmer for 20 to 25 minutes till the quinoa is cooked.
  13. Uncover and add the grated pumpkin to the pan.
  14. Mix well and let the stuffing cool down.
  15. Wash the peppers, halve them and remove the seeds and core.
  16. Take a couple of drops of olive oil in the palm of your hand and rub the pepper halves all over.
  17. Beat the egg(s) and add them to the stuffing along with crumbled feta.
  18. Break the toasted walnuts with your hands and add them, along with the sunflower seeds, to the stuffing. Mix well.
  19. Fill the pepper halves with the stuffing.
  20. Heat the pan in which you had made the stuffing. It should have some residue oil remaining so you don’t need to add any more oil but if you feel the need, add a couple of drops and swirl it around the surface.
  21. Once the pan heats up, gently place the peppers, lower the heat, cover and cook for 15 minutes.
  22. Uncover, flip them over, cover once again and cook for 10 more minutes.
  23. Uncover and gently turn the peppers over so that the stuffing is facing up.
  24. Slide them onto a plate and serve.

Note:

  1. These peppers can be eaten hot but are equally enjoyable at room temperature.
  2. You can make the stuffing ahead of time and keep it till you are ready to cook the peppers.
  3. Try and use different coloured peppers.
  4. The quantity of chilli may seem a lot, specially since the bird’s eye variety is hot, but they provide the right amount of oomph to counterbalance the natural sweetness of peppers and pumpkin. You can reduce the quantity if you prefer.

Suran (Elephant Foot Yam) Stir-fry

Suran (Elephant Foot Yam) Stir-fry

  • Servings: 1-2
  • Difficulty: easy
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Suran Stir-fry

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Firstly, the good news – suran (also known as elephant foot yam) is a dieter’s dream. Surprised? I certainly was!

During my most intense weight loss phase, I foolishly avoided this root vegetable thinking that it was high in calories and carbohydrates.

There came a day when I was craving suran so badly that I decided to look up its nutritional value. Lo and behold, I discovered the vegetable’s numerous health benefits.

Suran has plenty of minerals, omega 3, good for those watching their blood sugar level and is very high in fiber.

According to this website, “the fiber content in elephant yam is naturally high and therefore, it is usually considered a slimming food, as it promotes weight loss and reduces the levels of cholesterol in the body. If elephant yam is cooked in the right way, it can be eaten without any fear of weight gain.”

100 grams of the vegetable has 79 calories (same as white potato), but – in my humble opinion – is far healthier

Here’s a very quick and simple method of cooking suran which requires minimum ingredients. It is my mum’s recipe and, till recently, the only way I knew how to eat suran.

With benefit of new knowledge, looking forward to some kooky experiments with this hardy tuber.

easy, comforting and quite filling

Since I love it so much, I eat a bowl of this on its own for dinner. You can also serve it with any type of bread.

Ingredients

500 Grams suran

1-2 Teaspoons minced ginger-green chilli paste

1 Teaspoon turmeric powder

A generous pinch asafoetida

1-2 Teaspoons oil

Salt to taste

Method

  1. Peel and cube suran in even, bite size pieces. It is important to make sure that you try and cut them all the same size so that they cook evenly.
  2. Wash the suran cubes in plenty of water till the water runs clean.
  3. Heat the oil in a wok like pan.
  4. When the oil is hot, lower the heat and add the asafoetida and turmeric powder.
  5. Stir for 30 secs.
  6. Tip in the suran cubes, ginger-chilli paste and salt to taste.
  7. Mix well, cover and cook for about 20 minutes till suran is tender.
  8. Enjoy hot.

Note:

  1. Some varieties of suran can cause irritation to the throat therefore it is important to make sure that you cook the vegetable fully.
  2. If you have sensitive skin, you may like to rub some oil on your hands before you start peeling the suran. The oil acts as a protective barrier and won’t cause irritation.

Summer Salad of Mixed Sprouts & Vegetables

Summer Salad of Mixed Sprouts & Vegetables

  • Servings: 1
  • Difficulty: easy
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Summer Salad of Mixed Sprouts & Vegetables

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here’s another salad that can be put together in a jiffy.  The beauty of this recipe lies in its flexibility.

The salad can be enjoyed warm or cold; you can use whichever vegetables you have on hand and you can also substitute canned beans for mixed sprouts.

It is a main meal salad which doesn’t need any accompaniment (except, perhaps, a glass of wine!).

 simple yet delicious cool salad for a warm summer evening

Ingredients

1/2 Cup mixed sprouts OR canned/boiled beans of your choice

50 Grams sweetcorn kernel

100 Grams french beans

1 Large, chunky, carrot

2 White onion

1 Yellow or green courgette

1 Tablespoon olive oil

1 Tablespoon strong mustard

2 Tablespoons cider vinegar

Juice of one lime or lemon

Freshly ground black pepper

Salt to taste

Method

  1. Peel, wash and thinly slice the onion in half moon shape. Put it in a salad bowl. If you are using canned/boiled beans, you can add them to the onion at this stage. Cover and set aside.
  2. Top and tail the french beans and wash them.
  3. Wash the sweetcorn kernel.
  4. Wash and slice the courgette in chunks.
  5. Wash and slice the carrot in chunks.
  6. Place the french beans, sweetcorn, courgette and carrot in a steamer basket.
  7. Add mixed sprouts if using.
  8. Steam the sprouts and vegetables for 7 to 8 minutes till they become tender but retain a bite.
  9. While the steamer is working away, prepare the salad dressing.
  10. In a bowl, whisk together the lemon juice, cider vinegar, olive oil, mustard, salt and pepper. Check for taste and add a bit more of whatever you fancy.
  11. Once the vegetables and sprouts are cooked, add them to the bowl in which the onions are sitting.
  12. Pour the dressing over the vegetables and toss well.
  13. You can either enjoy the salad while it is still warm or refrigerate till you are ready to eat.

Guilt Free Pasta Salad

Guilt Free Pasta Salad

  • Servings: 1
  • Difficulty: easy
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Guilt Free Pasta Salad

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now that summer is upon us, my mind and stomach are turning towards luscious mangoes, juicy watermelon and cooling, fuss-free salads.

Here’s a pasta salad I made for last night’s dinner.

impromptu, good-for-you, balanced recipe of carbs, protein, dairy and vegetables

A little bit of pasta can go a long way if you load it up with vegetables. By this, I mean that you get the satisfaction of having had pasta while bulking it with all the good stuff.

You can use penne, farfale or any other chunky pasta of your choice.

Ingredients

1/2 Cup uncooked pasta

1 Chicken or vegetable stock cube

2-3 Tablespoons low fat, mild yoghurt

2-3 Cloves garlic

1 Teaspoon smooth mustard

1 Tablespoon hot sauce

1 Tablespoon olive oil

100 Grams broccoli

1/2 Cup mixed sprout

7-8 Cherry tomato

1 Yellow pepper

1 Small cucumber

1 Small bunch spring onion

Salt to taste

1 Tablespoon cider vinegar

1/2 Cup fresh parsley

Method

  1. Boil the pasta with a pinch of salt and the stock cube according to instructions on the packet. Drain and put in a big bowl.
  2. Peel and grate the garlic.
  3. To make the salad dressing, whisk together yoghurt, mustard, hot sauce, grated garlic, olive oil and salt to taste. Refrigerate till ready to use.
  4. Wash and finely chop the spring onion. Add it to the pasta bowl.
  5. Wash and halve the cherry tomato and throw them in the pasta bowl.
  6. Char-grill the pepper on the burner and let it cool down. Cover and keep aside, the steam helps loosen the skin.
  7.  Once the pepper has cooled, remove the charred bits. Cut in half, remove the core and the stem and slice it. Add to the pasta bowl.
  8. Wash and dice the cucumber and add to the pasta bowl.
  9. Wash and chop the broccoli.
  10. Wash the sprouts.
  11. Steam the broccoli and sprouts till tender but still with a bite (approximately 7 to 8 minutes). Add to the pasta bowl.
  12. Wash and chop the parsley and add to the pasta bowl.
  13. Now toss everything together, add the salad dressing and toss once again.
  14. Drizzle with the cider vinegar, mix well and serve.

Note:

  1. You can use any hot sauce of your choice.
  2. Use a strong mustard for a bit of zing.
  3. You can peel the cucumber if you wish, I prefer it with the skin on.
  4. If you like garlicky dressing, increase the number of garlic cloves.
  5. I have a double-decker steamer so saved time by boiling the pasta and steaming the broccoli and sprouts simultaneously.

Aubergine, String Beans & Black Chickpea, The Indian Way

Baingan, Chawli Beans Aur Kala Chana

  • Servings: 2-3
  • Difficulty: easy
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Aubergine, String Beans & Black Chickpea, The Indian Way

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My flatmate friend has just returned from a visit to her parents. Her mother has green fingers and successfully grows plenty of vegetables, fruits and flowers in their garden as well as a large terrace balcony.

This time round, some aubergine were brought back. They were quite unusual looking, pale violet, hefty bulbs.

The original idea was to make baingan bharta with the addition of some black chickpea (kala chana) and, to that end, I had even soaked some of the legume. But when it came to cooking time, I felt that the aubergine were more suited to a curry and so I literally made up the following recipe as I went along, with whatever was found in the cupboard and refrigerator.

the end result was totally yummy and satisfying

Goes very well with, both, rice and bread.

Don’t be put off by the amount of garlic – it makes all the difference to the dish.

Ingredients

1 Cup dry black chickpea (kala chana)*

150 Grams aubergine

250 Grams string beans (chawli beans)

2 Ripe tomato

1 Cup fresh coriander

2 Heads of garlic

2 Tablespoons freshly grated coconut

2 Tablespoons powder of roasted peanut

1-2 Teaspoons paste of ginger and green chilli

1-2 Teaspoons carom seeds

A large pinch of asafoetida

1 Teaspoon turmeric powder

1 Tablespoon coriander powder

1 Tablespoon cumin powder

Salt to taste

1 Tablespoon oil

Method

  1. Soak the black chickpea for 8 hours.
  2. Add a pinch of salt and boil them till tender. You can either do this in a pressure cooker or over the stove.
  3. Drain and keep aside. Reserve the cooking liquor.
  4. Chop and wash the string beans.
  5. Peel and slice the garlic along its length.
  6. Wash and dice the tomato.
  7. Chop and wash the coriander.
  8. Dice the aubergine and leave it covered in water.
  9. Heat the oil in a wok like pan.
  10. When it is hot, lower the heat and add the carom seeds followed by asafoetida.
  11. Stir for 30 seconds.
  12. Add the chopped string beans along with about a cup of the chickpea cooking liquor and salt to taste.
  13. Cover and cook for 5 minutes.
  14. Next, add the aubergine, ginger-green chilli paste, turmeric powder, coriander powder and cumin powder.
  15. Mix well, cover and cook for about 10 minutes.
  16. Uncover and throw in the cooked black chickpea, diced tomato, grated coconut and powdered peanut.
  17. Cover and cook for 5 to 10 minutes till the vegetables are tender.
  18. Stir in the coriander and serve hot.

Note:

  1. You can use canned chickpea if you prefer. You can also substitute chickpea with any other type of dry beans.