Category Archives: Indian Style

Autumnal Spinach & Carrot Soup, The Indian Way

Autumnal Spinach & Carrot Soup, The Indian Way

  • Servings: 1-2
  • Difficulty: easy
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Autumnal Spinach & Carrot Soup, The Indian Way

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My blogger friend Teagan of the Three Ingredients Serial fame invites her readers to send in three ingredients for each episode of an ongoing mystery story which she posts in installments.

Teagan uses the ingredients sent in by her avid readers to decide how to move the story forward on ‘per episode’ basis. Her abundant creativity and the clever way she makes use of these ingredients means that each episode takes us on a twisting, turning and teasing ride.

Today’s soup recipe is an ode to Teagan’s three ingredients serial.

I was planning on making a very simple spinach and carrot soup. Some tart yoghurt, ginger garlic paste and paste of minced chillies and ginger were beckoning me from the refrigerator. So, I decided to use these three ingredients (which I would otherwise not consider using in a soup) to create an Indianised spinach and carrot soup.

Mighty pleased to say that the soup turned out to be absolutely superb. So much so that there are a couple of other recipes patiently waiting their turn to be posted but this one’s jumped the queue!

a warming, spunky soup which makes you forget how healthy it actually is

Ingredients

250 Grams spinach

1 Medium size carrot

1 Medium size onion

1 Head of garlic

1 Teaspoon ginger-garlic paste

1 Teaspoon green chilli-ginger paste

1 Tablespoon tart/tangy/sour yoghurt

1-2 Teaspoons oil

1 Cup water

Salt to taste

Method

  1. Thoroughly wash the spinach.
  2. Wash, scrape and roughly chop the carrot.
  3. Boil the spinach and carrot in one cup of water and a pinch of salt.
  4. Once cooked, let the vegetables cool down completely.
  5. Blend the vegetables till you get a puree like consistency. It is okay if a few carrot pieces remain whole.
  6. Peel, wash and chop the onion.
  7. Peel and chop the garlic.
  8. Heat the oil in a pot.
  9. Once the oil is hot, lower the heat and throw in the onions and garlic with a pinch of salt.
  10. Stir, cover and cook for 5 minutes.
  11. Uncover and add the pastes of ginger-garlic and chilli-ginger.
  12. Add the yoghurt.
  13. Mix well.
  14. Add the pureed spinach and carrot.
  15. Check for soup like consistency. Add more water at this stage if you find it too thick.
  16. Check for salt and add a bit more if you feel it lacking.
  17. Bring to a rolling boil, lower the heat, cover and simmer for 5 minutes.
  18. Enjoy hot with some bread stick or crusty loaf.

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Mutton Dhansak with Brown Rice & Kachumbar

Mutton Dhansak with Brown Rice & Kachumbar

  • Servings: 3-4
  • Difficulty: easy
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Mutton Dhansak with Brown Rice & Kachumbar

 

 

 

 

 

 

I am so very excited to share today’s recipe with my fellow kooky cooks.

Dhansak is one dish that I have been meaning to make for the longest time but was a bit nervous thinking it was way too time consuming and elaborate with an over-stretched ingredients list. Glad to say I was proved wrong.

A few weeks back, I had this famous Parsi mutton and rice dinner at my friend Meher’s place. Having got the recipe from her, I mustered the courage to try it in my own kitchen.

Dhansak is a stew of mutton, dals and vegetables served over brown rice alongside some kachumbar.

Vegetables to be used include pumpkin, aubergine and small fenugreek leaves. If you can’t get hold of the latter, skip the leaves but don’t substitute with regular or dry variants.

Mutton dhahsak is the most authentic version although you do get chicken and vegetable dhansak as well.

The brown rice is actually white rice which is cooked in caramalised water.  It should become very brown, something I didn’t achieve in my first attempt (mine turned out a pale brown).

Kachumbar is a mixture of finely chopped onions and tomatoes with some chilli and coriander. You can also add a chopped cucumber if you wish.

I used ready prepared dhansak masala; it is available in most Indian grocery stores. Meher’s family use the Mangal brand which they say comes closest to the homemade version so I managed to get a packet from them.

There is one more component to dhansak which I skipped – kebabs.

one of the most satisfying dinner experience you will have

Enjoy with some chilled beer.

 

Ingredients for Dhansak

500 Grams mutton (preferably on the bone)

1/2 Cup tuvar dal

1/2 Cup masoor dal

125 Grams Pumpkin

4 Baby aubergine

4 Ripe tomato

2 Onions

2 Tablespoons ginger-garlic paste

2 1″ cinnamon sticks

4-5 Cloves

4-5 Whole peppercorns

3 Green cardamom

3 Black cardamom

2 Bayleaf

1-2 Tablespoons dhansak masala

2 Teaspoons turmeric powder

1 Tablespoon chilli powder

1-2 Teaspons jaggery powder (or a small lump of jaggery)

1-2 Tablespoons oil

Salt to taste

Method

  1. Soak the tuvar dal for 5-6 hours.
  2. Clean the mutton and apply a pinch of salt, 1 teaspoon turmeric powder and 1 tablespoon ginger-garlic paste.
  3. Cook the mutton in about 2 cups of water till tender.
  4. Drain the stock and set aside.
  5. Wash and cube the pumpkin (I didn’t peel it).
  6. Wash and cube the aubergine.
  7. Wash the masoor dal.
  8. Place the two dals, chopped vegetables, 1 teaspoon turmeric powder and a pinch of salt into a pot. Cook till meltingly soft. (You can do this in a pressure cooker if you wish).
  9. Once the dal and vegetables are cooked, mash them with the back of a spoon and set aside.
  10. Wash and puree the tomato.
  11. Peel, wash and chop the onion.
  12. Heat the oil in a large pot.
  13. Once it is hot, add the cinnamon stick, clove, peppercorn, cardamom and bayleaf.
  14. Lower the heat and add the onion along with salt to taste.
  15. Cover and cook for 5 minutes.
  16. Uncover and add 1 tablespoon ginger-garlic paste. Cook for 3 to 4 minutes.
  17. Add the tomato puree.
  18. Stir well, cover and cook for 5 minutes.
  19. Uncover and add the mutton, dal and vegetable mixture, dhansak masala, jaggery and chilli powder.
  20. At this stage, check for consistency. If you feel that it needs some water, add the mutton stock. But keep in mind that the dhansak should be fairly thick, not watery.
  21. Mix well and check for salt.
  22. Cover and cook for about 15 to 20 minutes.
  23. Take off the heat and keep aside till ready to serve.

 

Ingredients for Brown Rice

1 Cup white rice

2 Onions

1 Tablespoon sugar

1 Teaspoon salt

1 Tablespoon ghee

Method

  1. Wash and soak the rice for 30 minutes.
  2. Peel, wash and slice the onion.
  3. Take a pot to cook the rice in.
  4. Heat the ghee in it and when it has melted, add the sugar.
  5. Lower the heat and keep stirring till the sugar melts. It will become brown as it starts caramelising.
  6. Once the sugar has caramalised, add the sliced onions.
  7. Mix well, cover and cook for about 10 minutes. By the end, the onions should be nicely brown.
  8. Drain the rice and add to the browned onions, along with some salt.
  9. Gently mix.
  10. Add 2 cups of water, increase the heat and bring to boil.
  11. Once it reaches rolling boil, lower the heat, cover and cook for about 25 minutes till the rice is full cooked.
  12. Once cooked, take off the heat and let it sit for at least 5 minutes before serving.

Ingredients for Kachumbar

2 Onion

2 Ripe tomato

1 Cucumber (optional)

2 Green chilli

Small bunch fresh coriander

Juice of 1 lime or lemon

Salt to taste

Method

  1. Peel, wash and finely chop the onion.
  2. Wash and finely dice the tomato.
  3. Wash and finely chop the cucumber, if using.
  4. Wash, dry and finely chop the coriander.
  5. Wash and finely slice the chilli.
  6. Mix all the ingredients and chill for half hour before serving.

Serving Dhansak

  1. Serve some brown rice on a plate.
  2. Ladle dhansak on top of the rice.
  3. Serve kachumbar on the side.

Baingan Bharta/Smoked Aubergine, The Indian Way

Baingan Bharta/Smoked Aubergine, The Indian Way

  • Servings: 1-2
  • Difficulty: easy
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Baingan Bharta/Smoked Aubergine, The Indian Way

 

 

 

 

 

 

I think age is catching up on me because I often find myself checking my own blog to see whether I have posted a particular recipe! As was the case with today’s one and I cannot believe that having been blogging for nearly a year now, I have not written about one of my favourite Indian vegetable preparations.

baingan bharta is an ode to all aubergine lovers, or so I like to think

Smoked aubergine cooked with onions, tomato and garlic for a velvety, delicious vegetable which can be scooped with any type of bread or equally divine on some plain boiled rice – what is there not to like?!

Earlier, I used to smoke the aubergine directly on a gas burner as is. But I have recently discovered that if you oil it a bit, it truly imparts that smokey aroma and flavour. If you don’t have a gas burner, you can try it on a grill although I can’t vouch for the end result in terms of smokiness.

When choosing an aubergine for baingan bharta, go for one which doesn’t weigh too much (irrespective of size). The heavy ones have more seeds in them.

Ingredients

1 Medium size aubergine

2 Onion

1 Head of garlic

2 Tomato

2-3 Fresh green chilli

Fresh ginger the size of your thumb

1/2 Cup fresh coriander

1-2 Teaspoons cumin seeds

1 Teaspoon turmeric

1 Teaspoon chilli powder

1 Teaspoon garam masala

1 Tablespoon oil

Salt to taste

Method

  1. Wash the aubergine and apply a bit of oil all over.
  2. Place the aubergine on a gas burner and cook it till its skin is charred and the vegetable softens about 90% (you don’t want it completely collapsing). This does become slightly messy so be prepared to clean the burner afterwards!
  3. As soon as the aubergine is almost cooked on the open flame, transfer it to an airtight container. This way, it will cook in its own steam a bit more.
  4. In the meantime, peel, wash and dice the onion.
  5. Peel and chop the garlic.
  6. Wash and slice the green chilli.
  7. Peel, wash and grate the ginger.
  8. Wash, chop and dry the fresh coriander.
  9. Heat the oil in a frying pan.
  10. When the oil becomes hot, lower the heat and add the cumin seeds.
  11. As soon as they stop spluttering, throw in the onion, garlic, tomato, green chilli and ginger.
  12. Add turmeric powder, chilli powder and salt to taste. Mix well.
  13. Cover and cook for 10 minutes.
  14. While the onion mixture is cooking, go back to the aubergine.
  15. Remove the charred skin and roughly chop the flesh.
  16. Once the 10 minutes are up, uncover the pan and add the aubergine and garam masala powder. Mix well.
  17. Cover and cook for 5 minutes.
  18. Take off the heat and let it rest for 5 minutes.
  19. Add the fresh coriander before serving.

Moong Dal with Methi/Split Green Gram with Fenugreek Leaves

Moong Dal with Methi

  • Servings: 1
  • Difficulty: easy
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Moong Dal with Methi

 

 

 

 

 

 

Although I eat a lot of pulses and whole grains, I have realised that I don’t cook dal the Indian way (rather, hardly ever). Ironic considering the fact that Indian cuisine has a rich repository of dal recipes from across the country; different states and communities have their unique way of cooking this staple.

I favour one-pot meals and so I think I feel a bit lazy when it comes to cooking plain dal because than I would have to make a vegetable to go with it and that means more cooking and more washing up!

So I am delighted to share with you a one-pot meal, uncomplicated and quick dal recipe which requires no pre-soak and few spices.

I have combined the easy cooking yellow moong dal with methi leaves for a balanced dish. You can substitute methi with any other leafy vegetable.

this dal recipe proves that low in fat does not necessarily mean low in taste

Goes very well with, both, rice and any type of bread.

Ingredients

1/4 Cup moong dal

1 Cup fresh chopped methi leaves

1 Head of garlic

1 Onion

2-3 Green chilli

Fresh ginger the size of your thumb

1-2 Teaspoons mustard seeds

1-2 Teaspoons cumin seeds

1 Teaspoon turmeric powder

1 Teaspoon asafoetida

1 Tablespoon oil

Salt to taste

Method

  1. Wash and drain the methi leaves. Set aside.
  2. Wash the dal and leave it in 1/4 cup of water while you prepare the other ingredients.
  3. Peel and roughly chop the garlic.
  4. Peel, wash and dice the onion.
  5. Wash and slice the green chilli.
  6. Peel or scrape, wash and chop the ginger.
  7. Heat the oil in a frying pan or pressure cooker.
  8. Once the oil is hot, lower the heat and throw in the mustard seeds followed by cumin seeds.
  9. As soon as the seeds start spluttering, add the asafoetida and stir for 30 seconds.
  10. Next, add the chopped onion, garlic, chilli and ginger.
  11. Add salt to taste.
  12. Cover and cook for 5 minutes.
  13. Uncover and add the fenugreek leaves, dal along with the soaking water and turmeric powder.
  14. Mix well, cover and cook for about 20 to 25 minutes till the dal is soft. If cooking in pressure cooker, cook on high pressure for 4 to 5 whistles.
  15. Serve hot.

Kantola & Pumpkin Curry

Kantola & Pumpkin Curry

  • Servings: 2
  • Difficulty: easy
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Kantola & Pumpkin Curry

 

 

 

 

 

 

My love affair with kantola continues as I try to make the most of this elusive vegetable which is nearing the end of its season for this year.

Today’s recipe is another experiment from my kooky kitchen. I wanted to try out kantola paired with another vegetable in a curry (as opposed to a dry version).

Pumpkin came to mind because of its contrasting texture and taste.

The sauce is yoghurt based to give a bit of tarty kick.

I have also thrown in some tomato for good measure to boost the nutritional value of the dish.

opposites attract and, in this case, they make a very delicious pair

Will go equally well with any type of bread or rice. Serve some sliced onions doused in lime juice on the side.

Ingredients

250 Grams kantola

150 Grams pumpkin

2 Large tomato

Head of one large garlic

Small bunch fresh coriander

1/2 Cup tart/strong/sour yoghurt

1 Tablespoon cumin powder

1 Tablespoon coriander powder

1 Teaspoon turmeric powder

1 Teaspoon garam masala powder

1 Tablespoon minced ginger-green chilli paste

1 Teaspoon carom seeds (ajwain)

1 Teaspoon mustard seeds

1 Teaspoon fennel seeds

1 Tablespoon oil

Salt to taste

Method

  1. Wash and dry the kantola.
  2. Depending on their size, either quarter them or slice them.
  3. Wash and cube the pumpkin. I prefer to leave the skin on but you can peel it if you wish.
  4. Wash and roughly chop the tomato.
  5. Peel and slice the garlic along its length.
  6. Chop, wash and dry the coriander.
  7. Heat the oil in a frying pan.
  8. Once it is hot, lower the heat and throw in the mustard seeds followed by the carom and fennel seeds.
  9. Stir around for 30 seconds.
  10. Add the sliced kantola with salt to taste.
  11. Cover and cook for 5 minutes.
  12. In the meantime, whisk the yoghurt and add all the spices: coriander powder, cumin powder, garam masala powder, turmeric powder and paste of ginger-green chilli. Mix well.
  13. Return to the kantola. Uncover the pan and add the pumpkin, tomato and garlic.
  14. Add the spiced yoghurt mix.
  15. Combine everything together, cover and cook for 30 minutes till the vegetables are soft.
  16. Take off the heat and let the curry rest for about 5 minutes.
  17. Uncover, add the coriander leaves, mix and serve.

Mushroom & Mixed Sprouts Bajra Idli/Pearl Millet Idli with Mushroom & Mixed Sprouts

Mushroom & Mixed Sprouts Bajra Idli

  • Difficulty: easy
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Mushroom & Mixed Sprouts Bajra Idli

 

 

 

 

 

 

another kooky idli recipe from my kooky collection

There are some foods which are my “go to” dishes simply because they are time saving, labour saving, healthy, delicious and versatile. Using the base as a foundation, I can experiment, add, subtract knowing that the end result will turn out just fine. Idli is one such item.

Once you get the hang of the basics of fermentation, making idlis is a doddle. Soak, grind, leave to ferment and once the batter is fermented, you are good to go. Let your imagination run wild and play around with different types of grains and vegetables.

Today’s recipe is made of pearl millet batter and includes mushrooms and mixed sprouts. The combination may sound unusual because we don’t usually associate mushrooms with recipes from the southern part of India (I say usually, there may be exceptions).

If you are a fan of mushrooms, definitely give this one a go. These idlis are denser compared to the conventional ones but are super healthy, super yummy and super satisfying.

Serve with sambar and/or chutney. I had mine with carrot and coconut chutney.

Ingredients

1/2 Cup bajra grains

1/4 Cup urad dal

1 Tablespoon brown or regular rice

1 Tablespoon fenugreek seeds

200 Grams button mushroom

1/2 Cup mixed sprouts

1 Tablespoon paste of green chillies and ginger

1-2 Tablespoons instant oats

Salt to taste

Ghee to grease idli moulds

Method

  1. Wash and soak the bajra grains, urad dal, rice and fenugreek seeds for about 8 to 10 hours.
  2. Grind them into batter of pouring consistency.
  3. Leave the batter to ferment in a warm place.
  4. Fermentation can take anything from 6 hours to 36 hours.
  5. Once the batter is fermented, you are ready to make the idlis.
  6. Wipe/wash and roughly chop the mushroom.
  7. Add the mushroom, sprouts, paste of chilli and ginger, instant oats and salt to taste to the idli batter.
  8. Mix well.
  9. Grease the idli moulds with a little bit of ghee.
  10. Pour the batter into the moulds and steam for about 40 to 45 minutes. You know that the idlis are cooked if you insert a toothpick or a knife and it comes out clean.
  11. Once cooked, remove the moulds from the steamer and let the idlis rest for about 5 minutes.
  12. Gently run a toothpick or a knife around the edges of the idlis to loosen them.
  13. Enjoy hot.

A Very Leafy Egg Curry

A Very Leafy Egg Curry

  • Servings: 4-6
  • Difficulty: easy
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A Very Leafy Egg Curry

 

 

 

 

 

Wherever possible, I try to “healthyfy” conventional recipes. This could be through ingredients or cooking method.

So, when we were having an eggetarian friend over for dinner, I decided to cook an Indian style egg curry but with the addition of leafy vegetables to boost its nutritional value.

inclusion of spinach, amaranth leaves (lal saag) and fenugreek leaves resulted in this very nourishing egg curry

You can add whichever greens you can find. As for the fenugreek, I used the dried leaves (kasoori methi) but fresh ones would taste just as good.

Delicious with some roti, naan, sliced bread, tortilla, crusty roll or even plain rice.

Ingredients

10 Eggs

500 Grams fresh tomato

1 Cup ready tomato puree (packet/can)

500 Grams Onion

1/2 Cup ginger-garlic paste

1 Large bunch spinach

1 Large bunch amaranth leaves

1 Small bunch fenugreek leaves (or 2-3 Tablespoons dried fenugreek leaves)

1 Tablespoon coriander powder

1 Tablespoon cumin powder

1 Tablespoon chilli powder

1 Tablespoon turmeric powder

1 Tablespoon garam masala

1-2 Talespoons oil

4 Cloves

4-5 Cardamom

10-12 Whole black peppercorns

2-3 Bayleaf

Salt to taste

Method

  1. Wash, roughly chop and puree the tomato in a blender (without water).
  2. Peel, wash and finely chop the onion.
  3. Chop and wash the spinach.
  4. Chop and wash the amaranth leaves.
  5. If using fresh fenugreek, chop and wash.
  6. Hard boil the eggs.
  7. Once the eggs have cooled down, peel them.
  8. With a knife, make a cross at the base of each egg, away from the yolk side.
  9. Heat the oil in a large wok like pan.
  10. Once the oil is hot, add the bayleaf, cloves, cardamom and peppercorn.
  11. Next, add the chopped onion with a pinch of salt.
  12. Mix well, cover and cook for about 10 minutes.
  13. Uncover and add the ginger-garlic paste.
  14. Stir it into the onion and cook for about 7 to 8 minutes.
  15. Add the pureed fresh tomato along with packed/can of tomato puree.
  16. Throw in all the spices: coriander, cumin, chilli, turmeric and garam masala powders.
  17. Mix well and cook for about 5 to 6 minutes.
  18. Add about 2 cups of water and bring to boil.
  19. Add the chopped leafy vegetables (and dried fenugreek, if using).
  20. Add salt to taste. Mix well.
  21. Now, carefully, drop in the peeled eggs. Push them down gently with the back of a spoon so that they are submerged in the sauce.
  22. Lower the heat, cover and cook for 10 minutes.
  23. Once the egg curry is cooked, take the pan off the flame and let it rest for about 5 minutes before serving.

Kantola & Arbi

Kantola & Arbi

  • Servings: 2
  • Difficulty: easy
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Kantola & Arbi

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

indulge me my current kantola fetish a bit more my dear kooky readers

Today’s recipe is another made-up one from my kooky repertoire.

I thought of marrying the two seasonal vegetables for a hearty and delicious dish which can be enjoyed hot or cold, with bread or rotis or even on its own.

Arbi, also known as taro root, is full of goodness so even if you are watching your weight, I would urge you not to dismiss it as ordinary carb.

In this recipe, the arbi is first boiled, peeled and sliced before it gets cooked with kantola. I cooked mine in a pressure cooker (three pressures on high). If you prefer, you can cook it in a pan of boiling water. Don’t worry too much about its sticky attribute; once cooked you don’t notice it.

Ingredients

250 Grams kantola

250 Grams arbi

1 + 1 Tablespoon coriander powder

1 + 1 Tablespoon cumin powder

1 + 1 Tablespoon turmeric powder

1 + 1 Tablespoon chilli powder

1 Tablespoon fennel seeds

1-2 Tablespoons sesame seeds

1 Tablespoon cumin seeds

1 Tablespoon mustard seeds

1 Tablespoon oil

Salt to taste

Method

  1. Boil the arbi and once it cools down, peel and slice in rounds of medium thickness.
  2. In one bowl, add 1 tablespoon each of coriander, cumin, chilli and turmeric powder.
  3. Add this powder mix to the boiled, sliced arbi along with a pinch of salt.
  4. Toss so that the powders coat all arbi slices. Cover and set aside.
  5. Wash, dry and remove the top end of kantola.
  6. Cut the vegetable along its length and slice it.
  7. Heat the oil in a wok like pan.
  8. When the oil heats up, add the mustard seeds.
  9. Once they start spluttering, add the cumin, fennel and sesame seeds.
  10. Lower the flame and stir around for 30 seconds.
  11. Next, add the sliced kantola and the remaining powdered spices (1 tablespoon each of coriander, cumin, chilli and turmeric).
  12. Add salt to taste.
  13. Mix well, cover and cook for 20-25 minutes.
  14. Uncover and check for doneness.
  15. Add the sliced arbi coated in spice powders, mix well with the kantola, cover and cook for about 7 to 8 minutes.
  16. Take off the flame and let the cooked vegetables rest for 5 minutes before serving.

White Velvet Okra, The Indian Way

White Velvet Okra, The Indian Way

  • Servings: 1-2
  • Difficulty: easy
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White Velvet Okra, The Indian Way

 

 

 

 

 

I have just returned from a short break in Goa, a veritable food lovers’ paradise.

Memorable dinners include prawn curry (one of THE best I’ve ever had), red snapper stuffed with Goan masala, chicken biriyani and a kind of mutton stew. All to be enjoyed with some very moreish cashew feni!

Walked around Mapusa market which has the most amazing varieties of fresh produce, foods and other stuff. Unfortunately, I had left my camera in the room so couldn’t take photos and I was kicking myself throughout the visit to the market.

White Velvet Okragoa produces a lot of fruits and vegetables which are special to that region

One of those is white okra (safed bhindi). This variety of okra is very pale green in colour, slightly thicker in circumference and easily 10″-12″ long. Given its size, the vegetable is sold in units instead of by weight. The cooked okra is quite buttery in terms of texture.

I looked up white okra on the internet but there isn’t much information on this vegetable in cyberspace. According to this website, the vegetable (also known as white velvet okra) used to be grown in the Southern United States.

I did try Goan style okra while there and the taste is interesting because they add wet kokum to it (a first for me). But the following recipe is for regular Indian style okra adapted to white okra.

Will go well with any type of bread.

In the photograph above, in the salad on the left you might have noticed some cut lemons. They are also local to Goa. Slightly bigger than a golf ball, they have orange flesh and are unbelievably juicy.

Plenty of Goan trips are on the cards in the coming months so will be sharing more about Goan food culture as and when :-).

Ingredients

12 White Okra (or 500 grams regular okra)

1 Tablespoon coriander powder

1 Tablespoon cumin powder

1-2 Teaspoons turmeric powder

1-2 Teaspoons chilli powder

1 Tablespoon fenugreek seeds

1-2 Teaspoons asafoetida

1 Tablespoon oil

Salt to taste

Method

  1. Wipe the okra with a damp cloth.
  2. Remove the head and slice them into bite size pieces.
  3. In a bowl, mix the dry powders: coriander, cumin, turmeric and chilli.
  4. Heat the oil in a wok like pan.
  5. Once it is hot, add the fenugreek seeds followed by the asafoetida.
  6. Lower the heat and stir for about 30 seconds.
  7. Add the sliced okra, dry powders and salt to taste.
  8. Mix well, cover and cook for 20 minutes.
  9. Take off the flame and let the cooked vegetable rest for about 5 minutes before serving.

Kantola Per Eedu, The Parsi Way/Kantola with Eggs, The Parsi Way

Kantola with Eggs, The Parsi Way

  • Servings: 2
  • Difficulty: easy
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Kantola with Eggs, The Parsi Way

 

 

 

 

 

it’s raining kantola in my kooky kitchen at the moment

Following on from my mum’s recipe for this short-seasoned vegetable, today I am sharing with you an absolutely delicious version which I got from my friend Meher.

A couple of months back, Meher had taken me to see her mum who was just back home following a hospital stay. Mum’s lunch menu was Parsi style karela per eedu (bitter gourd with eggs). I was intrigued by this dish and guess it must have been hibernating at the back of my mind because when I was thinking of a different variation for kantola, I immediately thought of Meher’s mum’s lunch.

I got in touch with Meher who shared the following recipe with me.

Parsis love their eggs and they are happy to cook it on almost anything. Meher’s husband Percy told me that he even enjoys breaking a couple of eggs on potato straws (wafers/chips)!

If you like eggs and if you like kantola, I would highly recommend today’s recipe. The combination totally works.

If you intend to try this in your kitchen, don’t skip the fresh coriander because it freshly enhances the taste of the final dish. Also, according o Meher, the end result has to look green so use fresh green chilli instead of chilli powder.

Enjoy with any type of bread.

Another recipe for keeps.

Ingredients

500 Grams kantola

2 Eggs

1 Large onion

2 Tomato

10-15 Fresh curry leaves

Small bunch fresh coriander

2-3 Green chilli or 1 – 2 teaspoons paste of ginger and green chilli

1 Teaspoon turmeric powder

1 Tablespoon coriander powder

1 Tablespoon cumin powder

1 Teaspoon whole cumin

1 Tablespoon oil

Salt to taste

Method

  1. Wash and dry the kantola. You can either leave them in a colander for the water to drain or dry them on a kitchen towel.
  2. Top and tail the vegetable and slice it along its length.
  3. Peel, wash and slice the onion.
  4. Wash and slice the tomato.
  5. Wash and finely chop the green chilli, if using.
  6. Chop, wash and dry the coriander. Use its stalk if tender.
  7. Heat the oil in a frying pan.
  8. When hot, lower the heat and add the cumin seeds followed by the curry leaves.
  9. Next, add the onion and salt to taste.
  10. Stir, cover and cook for 5 minutes.
  11. Uncover and add the tomato.
  12. Again, cover and cook for 3 to 4 minutes.
  13. Uncover and add the kantola, turmeric powder, coriander powder, cumin powder and either chopped chilli or paste of chilli and ginger.
  14. Add more salt if necessary.
  15. Mix thoroughly, cover and cook for 20 minutes.
  16. Once the time is up, take the lid off and check for doneness.
  17. If you feel that the kantola is cooked, add the chopped coriander and mix well.
  18. Now, break the eggs over the vegetables, cover and cook for 5 minutes.
  19. Take the pan off the heat and let it sit for 5 more minutes so that the eggs cook some more in the steam.
  20. Enjoy hot.