Moong Bean Sprout & Carrot Upma

Savoury Indian Style Porridge with Moong Bean Sprout & Carrot

  • Servings: 2
  • Difficulty: easy
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Moon Bean Sprout & Carrot Upma

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I think upma is one of those Indian dishes which is universally popular among Indians (and would appeal to non-Indians as well if they were to be introduced to it).

A type of spicy porridge, it can be dressed up or down, enjoyed on its own or with chutney and sambar.

The other day, my flatmate friend’s niece sent her a photo of dosa-upma she had in Hyderabad. It is one of the specialties of this particular restaurant she visited. We were both very curious about this hybrid item. In the photograph it looks like a normal dosa so we are wondering whether upma is added to the dosa batter or the dosa is stuffed with upma?! If we find out and I try it out in my kooky kitchen, be sure that I will share it with my kooky readers here :-).

Coming to today’s upma recipe…

moong bean sprouts, grated carrots, onion and tomato make this a really yummy, moist dish

It is a recipe I made up. One of the joys of cooking for one is that you can be as crazy or zany as you like in terms of experiments. Some fail, some are success, some offer learnings but none are boring. I am also very fortunate to have a flatmate who has an adventurous palate and is a game to try my experiments, no matter how crazy they sound. This one gets a thumbs up from her.

In the photo, the final dish looks yellow but there is no turmeric added. The upma has taken on some colour from the carrots which also lend it a hint of sweetness.

If you have some moong bean sprouts in your kitchen, this is worth trying. In fact, I would say it is worth sprouting some moong beans just to make this!

Ingredients

1 Cup semolina

1 Cup moong bean sprouts

1 Large (or 2 small) carrots

2 Tomato

2 Onion

3-4 Green chilli

Fresh ginger the size of your thumb

Handful of fresh coriander leaves

15-20 Curry leaves

1 Teaspoon mustard seeds

1 Tablespoon urad dal (split black gram)

1 Teaspoon asafoetida

2-3 Dry red chilli

1 Cup yoghurt (tart/sour)

1 Tablespoon oil

1-2 Teaspoons ghee

Salt to taste

Method

  1. Dry roast the semolina on low flame for about 10 minutes. Set aside to cool.
  2. Peel, wash and chop the onion.
  3. Wash and dice the tomato.
  4. Wash and finely grate the carrot.
  5. Wash the curry leaves and dry them on some kitchen paper.
  6. Wash and chop the coriander leaves.
  7. Wash and finely slice the green chilli.
  8. Peel, wash and finely grate the ginger.
  9. Whisk the yoghurt and add 2 cups of water to it. Mix well and set aside.
  10. Break the dry red chilli into 2 to 3 pieces.
  11. Heat the oil in a wok like pan.
  12. Lower the heat and add the mustard seeds.
  13. As soon as they start spluttering, add the asafoetida followed by broken dry red chilli, curry leaves and urad dal.
  14. Fry for about 2 to 3 minutes (stirring frequently) till the urad dal turns light brown).
  15. Next, add the onions with salt to taste.
  16. Mix well, cover and cook for about 5 minutes.
  17. Uncover and throw in the tomato, sliced green chilli and grated ginger.
  18. Once again, mix well, cover and cook for about 5 to 7 minutes.
  19. Uncover and add the yoghurt-water mixture.
  20. Turn the heat to high and bring to boil.
  21. As soon as you see bubbles forming on the surface, lower the heat and add the roasted semolina, moong bean sprout, grated carrot and coriander leaves.
  22. Keep stirring for a couple of minutes till the semolina absorbs most of the moisture.
  23. Cover and cook for about 10 more minutes.
  24. Take the cooked upma off the heat.
  25. Grease a serving bowl with the ghee.
  26. Tip the upma in the ghee greased bowl, pat it down, cover and keep it for 5 minutes.
  27. Unmould and enjoy on its own or with some coconut chutney or sambar.

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Pumpkin & Moong Bean Sprout Idli, The Kooky Way

Pumpkin & Moong Bean Sprout Idli

  • Difficulty: easy
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Pumpkin & Moong Bean Sprout Idli

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If we go by some of the popular search engines, there is no recipe out there for idlis made from pumpkin and moong bean sprouts. So I like to think of this as one of my kooky inventions.

I may be wrong, the search engines may be wrong… If anybody has tried this combination before, would love to read about your experience.

My relationship with moong bean sprouts is quite rocky. There will be days and months when they are totally off my radar and than suddenly they appear and I end up sprouting a batch to last me through several recipes.

This time round, I have used moong bean sprouts in Healthy Maggi Noodles with Vegetables 3 and Colourful Sprouted Moong Bean Salad.

Now it is the turn of idlis. I still have a couple more recipes in which I will be using them after which we will be saying a temporary adios to each other!

In this recipe, I have used the traditional idli batter (makes a change from my usual rice free idlis).

A totally successful experiment worth repeating and an easy and fun way of incorporating more vegetables.

soft, fluffy, delicious and very healthy idlis

The following assumes you have some fermented idli batter and moong bean sprouts ready.

Depending on the size of your idli moulds, this will make about 8 to 10 idlis.

Ingredients

1 Cup fermented idli batter

150 Grams pumpkin

1 Cup moong bean sprouts

2 Tablespoons quick cooking oats

1-2 Teaspoons pure ghee

Salt to taste

Method

  1. Peel, wash and finely grate the pumpkin.
  2. In a bowl, combine the fermented idli batter with grated pumpkin, moong bean sprouts, quick cooking oats and salt to taste.
  3. Grease idli moulds with pure ghee.
  4. Pour the batter in the moulds and steam for about 30 to 40 minutes.
  5. Take out the idlis and leave them aside for about 5 minutes before unmoulding.
  6. Enjoy with some coconut chutney.

Coconut Chutney, The South Indian Way

South Indian Style Coconut Chutney

  • Servings: 3-4
  • Difficulty: easy
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Coconut Chutney, The South Indian Way

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here’s a really quick and simple recipe for South Indian style coconut chutney which will go very well with idlis, dosas, uttapams and upma.

For those who may be shying away from coconut thinking that it is fattening, here’s some good news.

coconut is good for health

Raw coconut contains a type of dietary fibre called medium-chain triglycerides which can lead to weight loss. It is also rich in other dietary fibres and contains a variety of fats which help boost our immune system.  Several types of minerals are also to be found in raw coconut which helps us maintain good health.

This chutney will stay good in the refrigerator for 4 to 5 days.

I had this with some pumpkin and moong bean sprout idlis. Delicious :-).

Ingredients

1 Cup fresh, shredded, coconut

3-4 Green chilli

Fresh ginger the size of your thumb

1/2 Cup fresh curry leaves

2 Tablespoons dalia dal (roasted split bengal gram)

1 Teaspoon mustard seeds

2-3 Dry red chilli

1 Teaspoon asafoetida

1 Tablespoon peanut or sesame oil

15-20 fresh curry leaves

Salt to taste

Method

  1. Dry roast the dali dal on a very slow flame for about 10 minutes. You may need to stir frequently. Set aside to cool.
  2. Wash the half cup of curry leaves. Dry them on a kitchen towel and set aside.
  3. Wash and chop the green chillies.
  4. Peel, wash and chop the ginger.
  5. In a blender or a food processor jar, add the roasted dalia dal, shredded coconut, green chilli, ginger, curry leaves and salt to taste.
  6. Add about half a cup of water and blend till you get a fine paste like consistency.
  7. Transfer to a bowl.
  8. Wash and dry the 15-20 curry leaves.
  9. Break the dry red chilli into 2 to 3 pieces.
  10. Heat the oil and when hot, lower the heat and add the mustard seeds.
  11. Once the seeds start spluttering, add the asafoetida, broken dry chilli and curry leaves.
  12. Stir for about 30 seconds and add this to the coconut chutney.
  13. Mix well and put the chutney in a bowl with airtight lid.

Note:

  1. You may need to ad more water, please adjust quantity accordingly.

Penne with Butter Bean & Avocado

Penne with Butter Bean & Avocado

  • Servings: 1
  • Difficulty: easy
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Penne with Butter Bean & Avocado

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Remember my recent post on Butter Bean & Avocado Spread? Well, I had some leftover so decided to use it as a stir-in sauce for pasta.

the creamy butter beans and avocado merge with warm penne beautifully for a sublime pasta experience

Like my previous pasta recipe, this time too, I used wholewheat (as opposed to white) penne and didn’t feel like I was eating something “boring healthy”.

And like my previous Maggi recipe, this is also a one-step cooking method (if you leave aside the pasta boiling step).

Ingredients

3-4 Tablespoons Butter Bean & Avocado Spread (or to taste)

1/2 Cup uncooked chunky pasta of your choice

1 Yellow Pepper

1 Large Onion

2 Ripe tomato

200 Grams mushroom

A handful of basil leaves

2-3 Bird’s eye chilli

Head of garlic

Juice of 1 lime or lemon

1 Tablespoon mixed herbs or Italian seasoning

1 Tablespoon olive oil

1-2 Tablespoons pine nuts

Grated Parmesan to serve

Salt to taste

Method

  1. Firstly, we need to marinade the vegetables for a few hours.
  2. Wash/wipe and halve or quarter the mushrooms (depending on their size).
  3. Wash, de-core, de-seed and chop the yellow pepper.
  4. Peel, wash and slice the onion.
  5. Wash and dice the tomato.
  6. Wash and slice the chilli.
  7. Peel and slice the garlic along its length.
  8. Combine the mushrooms, pepper, onion, tomato, chilli and garlic in a bowl.
  9. Add the olive oil, lemon juice, seasoning and salt to taste.
  10. Mix well, cover and refrigerate for 5 to 6 hours.
  11. When you are ready to prepare the dish, cook the pasta according to instructions on the packet. Drain and set aside.
  12. Dry roast the pine nuts till they tun a shade darker. Set aside.
  13. Wash and dry the basil leaves. Set aside.
  14. Heat a frying pan and add all the vegetables along with the marinade.
  15. Mix well, lower the heat, cover and cook for 10-12 minutes.
  16. Take the pan off the heat and stir in the boiled pasta, pine nuts, basil and butter bean & avocado mixture.
  17. Mix thoroughly and transfer to a pasta bowl.
  18. Sprinkle some parmesan and enjoy.

Note:

  1. This recipe can be enjoyed hot or at room temperature.

Colourful Sprouted Moong Bean Salad

Colourful Sprouted Moong Bean Salad

  • Servings: 1-2
  • Difficulty: easy
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Colourful Sprouted Moong Bean Salad

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

a colourful salad which combines the raw and the cooked, offering different textures with a bit of zing

You don’t need me to tell you how healthy sprouted moong beans are.

They are more nutritious uncooked but although I am a bit of a kooky health freak, the thought of chomping through a bowl of raw moong sprouts is not exactly appetising or appealing to me!

So I made up this recipe which combines the goodness of sprouts with other vegetables for a really flavourful, refreshing salad.

Purple cabbage, white onion, yellow sweetcorn, orange carrot, green moong sprouts and mint – only red seems to be missing!

Remember my purple cabbage and onion mixture from Mackerel Salad? That has been sitting subconsciously in my mind ever since and so I decided to use it as a base.

This is good to eat on its own (I had a plate full for dinner) or you can serve it as part of a meal.

The roasted seeds and fresh mint make all the difference so please don’t skip them.

Ingredients

1 Cup finely shredded purple cabbage

2 White onion

100 Grams sweetcorn

1 Large carrot

1 Cup sprouted moong beans

1 Cup fresh mint leaves

2 Tablespoons sunflower and/or pumpkin seeds

2 Tablespoons apple cider vinegar

Juice of 1 lime or lemon

1 Tablespoon olive oil

1 Tablespoon strong, smooth mustard

Salt to taste

Method

  1. First, you need to prepare the cabbage-onion mixture.
  2. Peel, wash and finely slice the onions in half moon rings.
  3. Separate the onion rings.
  4. Combine the shredded purple cabbage and onion rings in a bowl.
  5. Add the cider vinegar, a pinch of salt and toss well. Transfer to an airtight container and set aside to marinade for 4 to 5 hours.
  6. By the end of the marination time, the cabbage and onions will have softened and the onions taken on purple tinge from the cabbage.
  7. Dry roast the seeds till they release a nice, toasty aroma. Transfer to a plate and let them cool down.
  8. Wash the mint leaves and dry them on a kitchen towel.
  9. Wash and steam the sweetcorn kernels and set aside.
  10. Wash and coarsely grate the carrot and set aside.
  11. Wash the sprouted moong beans and set aside.
  12. To make the dressing, whisk together olive oil, mustard, juice of lime/lemon and salt to taste.
  13. In a salad bowl, add the cabbage-onion mixture, steamed sweetcorn kernels, coarsely grated carrot, sprouted moong beans and mint leaves.
  14. Pour the dressing and toss thoroughly.
  15. Sprinkle the toasted seeds and mix once more.
  16. Chill for a couple of hours before serving.

Note:

  1. I didn’t add any freshly ground black pepper to the dressing because I didn’t feel the need for it. It is purely personal preference, you can add a pinch if you like.

Butter Bean & Avocado Spread

Butter Bean & Avocado Spread

  • Servings: 2-4
  • Difficulty: easy
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Butter Bean & Avocado Spread

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The genesis of today’s recipe: the heat is on; I favour one-pot meals; I am trying to incorporate more beans and legumes into my diet.

The result: a creamy, good-for-you, cooling, versatile spread.

Also known as lima beans, butter beans are packed with the goodness of dietary fiber, molybdenum, copper, manganese and folate. They are also high in vitamins B1, B6 and iron.

combine them with nourishing avocado and you get one amazingly simple and delicious spread with endless possibilities

You can enjoy this with some crusty rolls, use as a sandwich filler, spread on a tortilla, mix with some warm pasta or serve with crudités.

I used dried butter beans which were soaked for 8 hours and boiled in a pressure cooker. You can use canned beans if you prefer, they are just as good.

Ingredients

1 Cup cooked butter beans

1 Ripe avocado

1 Head of garlic

1 Large onion

2 Tomato

1-2 Fresh bird’s eye chilli (optional)*

1-2 Tablespoons Worcestershire sauce

Juice of one large lime or lemon

1 Tablespoon olive oil

Salt to taste

Method

  1. If you are using chilli, wash and finely slice it.
  2. Peel and crush the garlic.
  3. Peel, wash and finely dice the onion.
  4. Wash and finely chop the tomato.
  5. Peel and chop the avocado.
  6. In a food processor, blend the butter bean and avocado till you get a paste (a bit lumpy is also fine).
  7. Combine the chilli (if using), crushed garlic, diced onion, chopped tomato and butter bean-avocado mixture in a bowl.
  8. Add salt to taste, Worcestershire sauce, lime/lemon juice and olive oil.
  9. Mix thoroughly, transfer to an airtight container and refrigerate for a couple of hours before serving.

Note:

  1. Chilli is optional but gives the spread a nice kick. If you prefer something milder, you can add a couple of drops of Tobasco.

Desi Green & Brown Chana Stir-fry

Desi Green & Brown Chickpea Stir-fry

  • Servings: 1-3
  • Difficulty: easy
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Desi Green & Brown Chana Stir-fry

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here’s another very quick and easy recipe which is low in fat and high on satisfaction barometer.

Desi chana are a variety of chickpea. According to wikipedia, these are “small, darker seeds [with] a rough coat, cultivated mostly in the India and much of the Indian Subcontinent, as well as Ethiopia, Mexico, and Iran.”

You can find them in several shades of black, brown, green and red. They have more fiber than their larger counterpart.

In today’s recipe, I have used the green and brown ones but you can use any type.

enjoy a bowl on its own, add to a salad, have as nibbles with drinks or serve as an accompaniment to any meal

Ingredients

1 Cup uncooked desi chana

1 Teaspoon chilli powder

1 Teaspoon turmeric powder

1 Teaspoon cumin powder

1 Teaspoon coriander powder

1 Teaspoon carrom seeds (ajwain)

1 Teaspoon asafoetida

Juice of 1 lime or lemon

Salt to taste

1 Tablespoon oil

Method

  1. Wash and soak the desi chana for about 8 to 10 hours.
  2. Boil them with a pinch of salt either in a pressure cooker (5 whistles on high) or the stove top way.
  3. Drain the cooking liquor and set aside.
  4. In a bowl, mix the turmeric, chilli, cumin and coriander powders along with salt to taste.
  5. Juice the lime or lemon.
  6. Heath the oil in a frying pan.
  7. When the oil is hot, lower the heat and add the carrom seeds followed by asafoetida.
  8. Stir for a few seconds and throw in the powders.
  9. Stir for about 15 seconds and add the boiled desi chana.
  10. Add the juice of lime or lemon, mix well, cover and cook for 5 minutes.
  11. Enjoy hot.

Note:

  1. Don’t throw away the cooking liquor. You can either use it as a stock, in some other recipe or drink it as is with a few drops of lemon juice. It is really delicious and full of goodness.

Healthy Maggi Noodles with Vegetables 3

Healthy Maggi Noodles with Vegetables 3

  • Servings: 1
  • Difficulty: easy
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Healthy Maggi Noodles with Vegetables 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Only a kooky cook like me can convert a 2 minute Maggi into a 45 minute elaborate recipe, right?! But this is – by far – the BEST Maggi I have cooked.

In case you are interested in trying out the recipe in your kitchen, worry not. Most of the time goes in preparing the vegetables. The actual cooking time is about 10-12 minutes.

one-pot, one-step, mouthwatering Maggi

Unlike my previous versions, this is a one-step method which does away with oil and stir-fry business. It was suggested to me by my flatmate friend who introduced me to Maggi in the first place. I was a bit unsure as to how it would turn out since I don’t like the thought of boiled onions (!) but she convinced me to give it a go. And no regrets.

I still have one more round of Maggi to get through after which we will observe Maggi moratorium ;-).

Ingredients

2 Cakes Maggi noodles

2 Sachets Maggi tastemaker

1 Cup sprouted moong

50 Grams French beans

2 Tomatoes

1 Large onion

1 Large carrot

1 Yellow pepper

2-3 Fresh chilli

1 Tablespoon grated cheese (optional)

1 Tablespoon chilli sauce

1-2 Tablespoons pumpkin and/or sunflower seeds

Salt to taste (optional)

Method

  1. Dry roast the seeds till they turn a couple of shades darker and release nutty aroma. Set aside.
  2. Wash the sprouted moong.
  3. Break the french beans into 2 to 3, depending on their size. Wash and set aside.
  4. Wash and chop the tomato.
  5. Peel, wash and chop the onion.
  6. Wash and grate the carrot.
  7. Wash, de-core, de-seed and dice the pepper.
  8. Wash and slice the chilli.
  9. Put all the vegetables in a cooking pot along with 1.5 cups of water.
  10. If you are adding salt for the vegetables, do so at this stage.
  11. Add the tastemaker mix.
  12. Bring to boil, lower the heat, cover and cook the vegetables for about 8 to 10 minutes till french beans are tender.
  13. Next, add the Maggi noodles, roasted seeds, grated carrots, chilli sauce, cheese (if using) and moong beans.
  14. Stir gently with a fork, cover and cook for 2 to 3 minutes till the noodles are soft.
  15. Enjoy hot.

Suran (Elephant Foot Yam) Stir-fry

Suran (Elephant Foot Yam) Stir-fry

  • Servings: 1-2
  • Difficulty: easy
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Suran Stir-fry

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Firstly, the good news – suran (also known as elephant foot yam) is a dieter’s dream. Surprised? I certainly was!

During my most intense weight loss phase, I foolishly avoided this root vegetable thinking that it was high in calories and carbohydrates.

There came a day when I was craving suran so badly that I decided to look up its nutritional value. Lo and behold, I discovered the vegetable’s numerous health benefits.

Suran has plenty of minerals, omega 3, good for those watching their blood sugar level and is very high in fiber.

According to this website, “the fiber content in elephant yam is naturally high and therefore, it is usually considered a slimming food, as it promotes weight loss and reduces the levels of cholesterol in the body. If elephant yam is cooked in the right way, it can be eaten without any fear of weight gain.”

100 grams of the vegetable has 79 calories (same as white potato), but – in my humble opinion – is far healthier

Here’s a very quick and simple method of cooking suran which requires minimum ingredients. It is my mum’s recipe and, till recently, the only way I knew how to eat suran.

With benefit of new knowledge, looking forward to some kooky experiments with this hardy tuber.

easy, comforting and quite filling

Since I love it so much, I eat a bowl of this on its own for dinner. You can also serve it with any type of bread.

Ingredients

500 Grams suran

1-2 Teaspoons minced ginger-green chilli paste

1 Teaspoon turmeric powder

A generous pinch asafoetida

1-2 Teaspoons oil

Salt to taste

Method

  1. Peel and cube suran in even, bite size pieces. It is important to make sure that you try and cut them all the same size so that they cook evenly.
  2. Wash the suran cubes in plenty of water till the water runs clean.
  3. Heat the oil in a wok like pan.
  4. When the oil is hot, lower the heat and add the asafoetida and turmeric powder.
  5. Stir for 30 secs.
  6. Tip in the suran cubes, ginger-chilli paste and salt to taste.
  7. Mix well, cover and cook for about 20 minutes till suran is tender.
  8. Enjoy hot.

Note:

  1. Some varieties of suran can cause irritation to the throat therefore it is important to make sure that you cook the vegetable fully.
  2. If you have sensitive skin, you may like to rub some oil on your hands before you start peeling the suran. The oil acts as a protective barrier and won’t cause irritation.

Healthy Whore’s Pasta, The Absorption Way

Penne Alla Puttanesca

  • Servings: 1
  • Difficulty: easy
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Healthy Whore's Pasta, The Absorption Way

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Today, I would like to share with you my take on the famous Italian puttanesca (literal translation, “in the style of the whore”).

This recipe is the result of some green pepper, baby aubergine and french beans I had lying around in my refrigerator. I thought of adding them to a pungent puttanesca sauce to be enjoyed with some penne.

I cooked wholewheat penne using the absorption method (where you boil the pasta along with the sauce instead of boiling it separately and then tipping it in the sauce). The ratio of pasta to water should be 1:2. It is my favourite way of cooking sauce based pastas since it saves on time and washing up!

This pasta is one of the best I have ever cooked. It tastes just like a “normal” puttanesca except that it is more nutritious thanks to the extra vegetables and some toasted seeds.

to use some vino lingo, here’s a bowl of full-bodied, robust pasta which you won’t forget any time soon

A note on the pasta used. Till recently, I have been cooking and eating white pasta. I have now switched over to wholewheat pasta (fewer calories and carbohydrates) and I don’t notice any change. Many say that it is supposed to be chewier but I didn’t find this to be the case (unlike brown rice where I do taste the difference). So I feel as if I am getting the benefit of wholewheat pasta without sacrificing on taste.

Vegetarians can omit the anchovies.

Ingredients

1/2 Cup uncooked pasta

1 Cup water

2 Onions

1 Head of garlic

3-4 Fresh red chilli (or chilli flakes)

3 Large ripe tomato

1 Green pepper

4 Baby Aubergine

100 Grams french beans

Handful of fresh basil leaves

1 /2 Cup tomato puree

2 Tablespoons capers

2-3 Anchovy fillets

1 Tablespoons olive oil

Salt to taste

2 Tablespoons pitted black olives

1-2 Tablespoons sunflower and/or pumpkin seeds

Grated Parmesan to serve

Method

  1. Peel, wash and dice the onion.
  2. Peel and slice or mince the garlic.
  3. Wash and finely chop the tomato.
  4. Wash and slice the chilli (if using).
  5. Wash, de-seed, de-core and chop the green pepper.
  6. Wash and snap the french beans in two.
  7. Wash, remove the top and finely chop the baby aubergine.
  8. Wash and shred the basil by hand or with a knife.
  9. Dry roast the seeds till they turn a couple of shades darker and start smelling toasty.
  10. In a bowl, add the tomato puree, anchovies, capers and olives.
  11. Heat the oil in a pan.
  12. When it is hot, lower the heat and add the onion, garlic and chilli (or chilli flakes).
  13. Add salt to taste, mix well, cover and cook for 5 minutes.
  14. Next, add the tomato and green pepper, cover and cook for 3 to 4 minutes.
  15. Next, add the aubergine, cover and cook for about 5 minutes.
  16. Now, add the basil, tomato puree, olives, capers and anchovies. Mix well.
  17. Next, add the pasta and combine it with the rest of the ingredients.
  18. Add water, turn the heat to high and bring the sauce to boil.
  19. Once bubbles start appearing on the surface, lower the heat, cover and let the pasta cook for about 15 minutes.
  20. Transfer to a bowl, garnish with the toasted seeds and sprinkle grated Parmesan according to taste.

Note:

  1. If you are a big anchovy fan like me, feel free to add more of it for an anchovy-y taste (if that makes sense!).